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Networks, Crowds, and Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Easley,David
  • Kleinberg,Jon

Abstract

Are all film stars linked to Kevin Bacon? Why do the stock markets rise and fall sharply on the strength of a vague rumour? How does gossip spread so quickly? Are we all related through six degrees of separation? There is a growing awareness of the complex networks that pervade modern society. We see them in the rapid growth of the internet, the ease of global communication, the swift spread of news and information, and in the way epidemics and financial crises develop with startling speed and intensity. This introductory book on the new science of networks takes an interdisciplinary approach, using economics, sociology, computing, information science and applied mathematics to address fundamental questions about the links that connect us, and the ways that our decisions can have consequences for others.

Suggested Citation

  • Easley,David & Kleinberg,Jon, 2010. "Networks, Crowds, and Markets," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521195331, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521195331
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Diebold, Francis X. & Yılmaz, Kamil, 2014. "On the network topology of variance decompositions: Measuring the connectedness of financial firms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 182(1), pages 119-134.
    2. Martin L. Weitzman, 2015. "A Voting Architecture for the Governance of Free-Driver Externalities, with Application to Geoengineering," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(4), pages 1049-1068, October.
    3. Mariann Ollar & Marzena Rostek, 2011. "Information Aggregation and Innovation in Market Design," Working Papers 11-12, NET Institute.
    4. Diebold, Francis X. & Yilmaz, Kamil, 2015. "Financial and Macroeconomic Connectedness: A Network Approach to Measurement and Monitoring," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199338306.
    5. Noemí Navarro, 2014. "Expected fair allocation in farsighted network formation," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 43(2), pages 287-308, August.
    6. Alexei P Kireyev & Andrei Leonidov, 2015. "Network Effects of International Shocks and Spillovers," IMF Working Papers 15/149, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Bernd (B.) Heidergott & Jia-Ping Huang & Ines (I.) Lindner, 2018. "Naive Learning in Social Networks with Random Communication," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 18-018/II, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Guan, Jiancheng & Zhang, Jingjing & Yan, Yan, 2015. "The impact of multilevel networks on innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 545-559.
    9. Lapatinas Athanasios, 2014. "Understanding Voting Behaviour in Complex Political Systems," Mathematical Economics Letters, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3-4), pages 1-7, November.
    10. Kenan Huremovic, 2014. "Rent Seeking and Power Hierarchies: A Noncooperative Model of Network Formation with Antagonistic Links," Working Papers 2014.45, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    11. Andrei, Amanda L. & Comer, Kevin & Koehler, Matthew, 2014. "An agent-based model of network effects on tax compliance and evasion," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 119-133.
    12. Ron W. NIELSEN, 2016. "Mathematical Analysis of Historical Income Per Capita Distributions," Turkish Economic Review, KSP Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 300-319, June.
    13. Lomi, Alessandro & Fonti, Fabio, 2012. "Networks in markets and the propensity of companies to collaborate: An empirical test of three mechanisms," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 216-220.
    14. STANKOVA, Marija & MARTENS, David & PROVOST, Foster, 2015. "Classification over bipartite graphs through projection," Working Papers 2015001, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    15. repec:wsi:acsxxx:v:15:y:2012:i:supp0:n:s0219525912500695 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:oup:jeurec:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:784-817. is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Ilaria Bordino & Stefano Battiston & Guido Caldarelli & Matthieu Cristelli & Antti Ukkonen & Ingmar Weber, 2011. "Web search queries can predict stock market volumes," Papers 1110.4784, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2012.
    18. Aimée Backiel & Bart Baesens & Gerda Claeskens, 2016. "Predicting time-to-churn of prepaid mobile telephone customers using social network analysis," Journal of the Operational Research Society, Palgrave Macmillan;The OR Society, vol. 67(9), pages 1135-1145, September.
    19. Ilse Lindenlaub & Anja Prummer, 2016. "Gender, Social Networks and Peformance," Working Papers 807, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    20. Mert Demirer & Francis X. Diebold & Laura Liu & Kamil Yilmaz, 2015. "Estimating Global Bank Network Connectedness," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1512, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    21. Todor Krastevich, 2013. "Predicting Consumer Choices Through Analysis of Interactions in Social Networks," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 3, pages 24-40, September.
    22. Andrew Mays & Gary S. Shea, 2011. "East India Company and Bank of England Shareholders during the South Sea Bubble: Partitions, Components and Connectivity in a Dynamic Trading Network," CDMA Working Paper Series 201109, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    23. Ilse Lindenlaub & Anja Prummer, 2014. "Gender, Social Networks And Performance," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1461, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    24. Alexei P Kireyev & Andrei Leonidov, 2016. "China’s Imports Slowdown; Spillovers, Spillins, and Spillbacks," IMF Working Papers 16/51, International Monetary Fund.
    25. Syngjoo Choi & Andrea Galeotti & Sanjeev Goyal, 2017. "Trading in Networks: Theory and Experiments," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 784-817.

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