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A Global Green New Deal

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Listed:
  • Barbier,Edward B.

Abstract

Meeting the short run challenges of reviving the worldwide economy need not mean sacrificing long run economic and environmental sustainability. A Global Green New Deal (GGND) is an economic policy strategy for ensuring a more economically and environmentally sustainable world economic recovery. Reviving growth and creating jobs should be essential objectives. But policies should also aim to reduce carbon dependency, protect ecosystems and water resources, and alleviate poverty. Otherwise, economic recovery today will do little to avoid future economic and environmental crises. Part One argues why a GGND strategy is essential to the sustainability of the global economy. Part Two provides an overview of the key national policies whilst Part Three focuses on the global actions necessary to allow national policies to work. Part Four summarizes the main recommendations for national and international action, and discusses the wider implications for restructuring the world economy towards 'greener' development.

Suggested Citation

  • Barbier,Edward B., 2010. "A Global Green New Deal," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521132022, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521132022
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    Cited by:

    1. Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana & Kelemen, Agnes & Tirado-Herrero, Sergio & Thomas, Stefan & Thema, Johannes & Mzavanadze, Nora & Hauptstock, Dorothea & Suerkemper, Felix & Teubler, Jens & Gupta, Mukesh & Chatter, 2016. "Measuring multiple impacts of low-carbon energy options in a green economy context," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1409-1426.
    2. Jari Lyytimäki, 2011. "Mainstreaming climate policy: the role of media coverage in Finland," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 649-661, August.
    3. Ian H. Rowlands, 2011. "Co-impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation in Africa�s least developed countries: the evidence base and research needs," GRI Working Papers 39, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. Mundaca T., Luis & Markandya, Anil & Nørgaard, Jørgen, 2013. "Walking away from a low-carbon economy? Recent and historical trends using a regional decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1471-1480.
    5. Joy Kim & Suh-Yong Chung, 2012. "The role of the G20 in governing the climate change regime," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 361-374, November.
    6. Rowlands, Ian, 2011. "Co-impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation in Africa’s least developed countries: the evidence base and research needs," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37575, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Frank W. Geels, 2013. "The impact of the financial-economic crisis on sustainability transitions: Financial investment, governance and public discourse," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 39, WWWforEurope.
    8. Mundaca, Luis & Markandya, Anil, 2016. "Assessing regional progress towards a ‘Green Energy Economy’," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1372-1394.
    9. Chao Wei & Shanjun Li, 2014. "The Cost of Greening Stimulus: A Dynamic Discrete Choice Analysis of Vehicle Scrappage Programs," Working Papers 2014-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    10. Ian Rowlands, 2011. "Ancillary impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation options in Africa’s least developed countries," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 16(7), pages 749-773, October.
    11. Terry Barker & Annela Anger & Unnada Chewpreecha & Hector Pollitt, 2012. "A new economics approach to modelling policies to achieve global 2020 targets for climate stabilisation," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 205-221, October.
    12. Mundaca, Luis & Román, Rocio & Cansino, José M., 2015. "Towards a Green Energy Economy? A macroeconomic-climate evaluation of Sweden’s CO2 emissions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 196-209.
    13. Andreas A. Papandreou, 2015. "The Great Recession and the transition to a low-carbon economy," Working papers wpaper88, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
    14. Mundaca, Luis & Luth Richter, Jessika, 2015. "Assessing ‘green energy economy’ stimulus packages: Evidence from the U.S. programs targeting renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1174-1186.

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