IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/cup/cbooks/9780521055390.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

The Institutional Economics of Foreign Aid

Author

Listed:
  • Martens,Bertin
  • Mummert,Uwe
  • Murrell,Peter
  • Seabright,Paul

Abstract

This book is about the institutions, incentives and constraints that guide the behaviour of people and organizations involved in the implementation of foreign aid programmes. While traditional performance studies tend to focus almost exclusively on the policies and institutions in recipient countries, this book looks at incentives in the entire chain of organizations involved in the delivery of foreign aid, from donor governments and agencies to consultants, experts and other intermediaries. Four aspects of foreign aid delivery are examined in detail: incentives inside donor agencies, the interaction of subcontractors with recipient organizations, incentives inside recipient country institutions, and biases in aid performance monitoring systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Martens,Bertin & Mummert,Uwe & Murrell,Peter & Seabright,Paul, 2008. "The Institutional Economics of Foreign Aid," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521055390, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521055390
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ajit Mishra & S Sarangi, 2010. "Provider Incentives and Delivery of Developmental Goods," Department of Economics Working Papers 14/10, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    2. Gaarder, Marie M. & Bartsch, Ulrich, 2014. "The second wave of independence : shopping for solutions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7069, The World Bank.
    3. J. Vernon Henderson & Yong Suk Lee, 2015. "Organization of Disaster Aid Delivery: Spending Your Donations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(4), pages 617-664.
    4. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2014. "Making Aid Work: Governance and Decentralization," Working Papers 2014-11, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gulrajani, Nilima, 2010. "Challenging global accountability: the intersection of contracts and culture in the World Bank," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30045, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Ronelle Burger & Trudy Owens, "undated". "Receive Grants or Perish? The Survival Prospects of African Nongovernmental Organizations," Discussion Papers 11/07, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    7. Jisun Yi, 2015. "Lessons for Japanese foreign aid from research on aid's impact," WIDER Working Paper Series 055, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Enrico Colombatto, 2003. "Why is Corruption Tolerated?," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 363-379, December.
    9. Spencer Elizabeth Crawford, 2015. "Revising the Role of Contract in Development Cooperation," The Law and Development Review, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 147-186, June.
    10. Victor, David G., 2013. "Foreign Aid for Capacity-Building to Address Climate Change: Insights and Applications," WIDER Working Paper Series 084, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521055390. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ruth Austin) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Ruth Austin to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://www.cambridge.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.