IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Public Administration: Main Factor in Successful Management of Coastal Area Development in Republic of Croatia


  • Alen Jugovic

    () (Faculty of Maritime Studies, University of Rijeka)


The modern society requires a rational, professional, stable and socially accountable public administration that serves its citizens. Analysis of the status and functioning of the Croatian public administration shows that there are still many shortcomings and problems that must be solved. This paper outlines the basic characteristics of public administration as a set of structures and processes aiming to start and implement the policies in accordance with the public interest. Also, it explores the way and the level of success of managing the common good, with special attention given to the management of the coastal area, whereas the management of the coastal area is defined as an activity comprising different levels of management - local, regional, national and international. The author stresses the need to coordinate the different levels and emphasize the importance of organizing the work process and the capabilities of the managing structure. This is necessary because the public administration often makes decisions directly influencing the citizens' quality of life on a local and individual level. Given that the public administration has a great amount of power in all countries, it must be controlled. The author states that beside self control of public administration it is also needed to conduct the additional control. That kind of control is necessary due to the inestimable value of Croatia's coastal and other resources. Based on the results of the research the author suggests measures to improve a continued and efficient control.

Suggested Citation

  • Alen Jugovic, 2012. "Public Administration: Main Factor in Successful Management of Coastal Area Development in Republic of Croatia," Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems - scientific journal, Croatian Interdisciplinary Society Provider Homepage:, vol. 10(1), pages 16-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:zna:indecs:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:16-27

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sheri M. Markose, 2005. "Computability and Evolutionary Complexity: Markets as Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS)," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(504), pages 159-192, June.
    2. César Ducruet & Sung-Woo Lee & Adolf K.Y. Ng, 2010. "Centrality and vulnerability in liner shipping networks: revisiting the Northeast Asian port hierarchy," Maritime Policy & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 17-36, January.
    3. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2010. "Complexity Thinking and Evolutionary Economic Geography," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Van Bergeijk, Peter A G & Berk, Jan Marc, 2001. "European Monetary Union, the Term Structure, and the Lucas Critique," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 547-556.
    5. David Glen & Peter Marlow, 2009. "Maritime Statistics: a new forum for practitioners," Maritime Policy & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 185-195, April.
    6. John Foster, 2005. "From simplistic to complex systems in economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 873-892, November.
    7. Keshavarz, Nastaran & Nutbeam, Don & Rowling, Louise & Khavarpour, Freidoon, 2010. "Schools as social complex adaptive systems: A new way to understand the challenges of introducing the health promoting schools concept," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(10), pages 1467-1474, May.
    8. Notteboom Theo E., 2004. "Container Shipping And Ports: An Overview," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-21, June.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr, 1976. "Econometric policy evaluation: A critique," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-46, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    public administration; management; coastal area; organization; strategy; control;

    JEL classification:

    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zna:indecs:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:16-27. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Josip Stepanic). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.