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Macroeconomic Implications of Agglomeration

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  • Morris A. Davis
  • Jonas D. M. Fisher
  • Toni M. Whited

Abstract

Cities exist because of the productivity gains that arise from clustering production and workers, a process called agglomeration. How important is agglomeration for aggregate growth? This paper constructs a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model of cities and uses it to estimate the effect of local agglomeration on aggregate growth. We combine aggregate time‐series and city‐level panel data to estimate the model's parameters via generalized method of moments. The estimates imply a statistically and economically significant impact of local agglomeration on the growth rate of per capita consumption, raising it by about 10%.

Suggested Citation

  • Morris A. Davis & Jonas D. M. Fisher & Toni M. Whited, 2014. "Macroeconomic Implications of Agglomeration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(2), pages 731-764, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:emetrp:v:82:y:2014:i:2:p:731-764
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecta.2014.82.issue-2.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerald A. Carlino, 2011. "Three keys to the city: resources, agglomeration economies, and sorting," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 1-13.
    2. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon, 2016. "The Production Function for Housing: Evidence from France," PSE Working Papers halshs-01400852, HAL.
    3. Guilherme Bandeira & Jordi Caballe & Eugenia Vella, 2019. "Fiscal Austerity and Migration: A Missing Link," Working Papers 2019009, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    4. Jeffrey Lin, 2011. "Urban productivity advantages from job search and matching," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q1, pages 9-16.
    5. repec:eee:moneco:v:93:y:2018:i:c:p:89-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jan Eeckhout & Roberto Pinheiro & Kurt Schmidheiny, 2010. "Spatial Sorting: Why New York, Los Angeles and Detroit Attract the Greatest Minds as well as the Unskilled," CESifo Working Paper Series 3274, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. repec:bla:etrans:v:25:y:2017:i:3:p:439-469 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Davis, Morris A. & Fisher, Jonas D. M. & Veracierto, Marcelo, 2013. "Gross Migration, Housing and Urban Population Dynamics," Working Paper Series WP-2013-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    9. Brinkman, Jeffrey C., 2016. "Congestion, agglomeration, and the structure of cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 13-31.
    10. Herkenhoff, Kyle F. & Ohanian, Lee E. & Prescott, Edward C., 2018. "Tarnishing the golden and empire states: Land-use restrictions and the U.S. economic slowdown," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 89-109.
    11. Davis, Morris A. & Van Nieuwerburgh, Stijn, 2015. "Housing, Finance, and the Macroeconomy," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    12. Wukuang Cun & M. Hashem Pesaran, 2018. "Land Use Regulations, Migration and Rising House Price Dispersion in the U.S," CESifo Working Paper Series 7007, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Huang, Daisy J. & Leung, Charles K. & Qu, Baozhi, 2015. "Do bank loans and local amenities explain Chinese urban house prices?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 19-38.
    14. Frydman, Carola & Papanikolaou, Dimitris, 2018. "In search of ideas: Technological innovation and executive pay inequality," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(1), pages 1-24.
    15. Jeffrey Brinkman & Daniele Coen-Pirani & Holger Sieg, 2012. "Estimating a dynamic equilibrium model of firm location choices in an urban economy," Working Papers 12-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    16. Guilherme Bandeira & Jordi Caballé & Eugenia Vella, 2018. "Should I stay or should I go? Austerity, unemployment and migration," Working Papers 1839, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.

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