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The Great Recession and Mothers' Health

Author

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  • Janet Currie
  • Valentina Duque
  • Irwin Garfinkel

Abstract

We use longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Well†being Study to investigate the impacts of the Great Recession on the health of mothers. We focus on a wide range of physical and mental health outcomes, as well as health behaviour. We find that increases in the unemployment rate decrease self†reported health status and increase smoking and drug use. We also find evidence of heterogeneous impacts. Disadvantaged mothers – African American, Hispanic, less educated and unmarried – experience greater deterioration in their health than advantaged mothers – those who are white, married and college educated.

Suggested Citation

  • Janet Currie & Valentina Duque & Irwin Garfinkel, 2015. "The Great Recession and Mothers' Health," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(588), pages 311-346, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:econjl:v:125:y:2015:i:588:p:f311-f346
    DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12239
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    Cited by:

    1. Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2020. "Job loss at home: children’s school performance during the Great Recession," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 243-286, September.
    2. Xavier Pautrel, 2018. "Environmental Policy and Health in the Presence of Labor Market Imperfections," TEPP Working Paper 2018-09, TEPP.
    3. Lauren E. Jones & Kevin Milligan & Mark Stabile, 2019. "Child cash benefits and family expenditures: Evidence from the National Child Benefit," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 52(4), pages 1433-1463, November.
    4. Markowitz, Sara & Nesson, Erik & Robinson, Joshua J., 2019. "The effects of employment on influenza rates," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 286-295.
    5. Dugan, Jerome & Booshehri, Layla G. & Phojanakong, Pam & Patel, Falguni & Brown, Emily & Bloom, Sandra & Chilton, Mariana, 2020. "Effects of a trauma-informed curriculum on depression, self-efficacy, economic security, and substance use among TANF participants: Evidence from the Building Health and Wealth Network Phase II," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 258(C).
    6. Valentina Duque & Natasha V Pilkauskas & Irwin Garfinkel, 2018. "Assets among low-income families in the Great Recession," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(2), pages 1-21, February.
    7. Clark, Andrew E. & D’Ambrosio, Conchita & Rohde, Nicholas, 2021. "Prenatal economic shocks and birth outcomes in UK cohort data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C).
    8. Hiilamo, Aapo & Hiilamo, Heikki & Ristikari, Tiina & Virtanen, Petri, 2021. "Impact of the Great Recession on mental health, substance use and violence in families with children: A systematic review of the evidence," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 121(C).
    9. Vanessa M Oddo & Jessica C Jones-Smith, 2020. "Unemployment during the Great Recession and Large-for-Gestational-Age births," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-12, May.
    10. Öztürk, Gamze & Yetkiner, Hakan & Özden, Elif, 2020. "Macroeconomic determinants of antidepressant use," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1394-1407.
    11. Otto Lenhart, 2019. "The effects of health shocks on labor market outcomes: evidence from UK panel data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(1), pages 83-98, February.
    12. De Cao, Elisabetta & McCormick, Barry & Nicodemo, Catia, 2019. "Does Unemployment Worsen Babies' Health? A Tale of Siblings, Maternal Behaviour and Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 12568, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Briody, Jonathan & Doyle, Orla & Kelleher, Cecily, 2020. "The effect of local unemployment on health: A longitudinal study of Irish mothers 2001-2011," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    14. Ryan Compton & Daniel Giedeman & Leslie Muller, 2018. "Racial Differentials in the Wealth Effects of the Financial Crisis and Great Recession," Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 126-141, September.
    15. Lin, Chung-Liang, 2021. "Postpartum medical utilization: The role of prenatal economic activity and living costs," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C).
    16. Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 0. "Job loss at home: children’s school performance during the Great Recession," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 0, pages 1-44.
    17. Ha Trong Nguyen & Luke Brian Connelly, 2018. "Out of sight but not out of mind: Home countries' macroeconomic volatilities and immigrants' mental health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 189-208, January.
    18. Briody, Jonathan, 2021. "Parental unemployment during the Great Recession and childhood adiposity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 275(C).

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