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How Much Would it Cost to Avoid Climate Change?

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  • Bryan Buckley
  • Sergey Mityakov

Abstract

This paper summarises various estimates of the costs of mitigation of the adverse impact of climate change. It finds that the differences in the estimated impacts on gross domestic product, consumption, employment, and gasoline, electricity and natural gas prices are driven mainly by the following factors: the time frame of new technology development, the growth potential of existing clean sources of energy, the availability of offsets (domestic, international), and the banking of allowances. However, its main finding is that, even for more optimistic estimates, the mitigation costs are likely to amount to as much as a 1% drop in consumption, starting today and going into the future, which, as is argued in this paper, constitutes an enormous impact on social welfare. Thus, it is important to carefully assess the costs of global warming to see whether they justify such drastic measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Bryan Buckley & Sergey Mityakov, 2009. "How Much Would it Cost to Avoid Climate Change?," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 10(1), pages 107-150, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wej:wldecn:369
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bakshi, Gurdip S & Chen, Zhiwu, 1996. "Inflation, Asset Prices, and the Term Structure of Interest Rates in Monetary Economies," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, pages 241-275.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1996. "Inflation and growth," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, pages 153-169.
    3. Claudio Borio & Ilhyock Shim, 2007. "What can (macro-)prudential policy do to support monetary policy?," BIS Working Papers 242, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1999. "Monetary policy and asset price volatility," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 77-128.
    5. Claudio Borio & William English & Andrew Filardo, 2003. "A tale of two perspectives: old or new challenges for monetary policy?," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Monetary policy in a changing environment, volume 19, pages 1-59 Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Bakshi, Gurdip S & Chen, Zhiwu, 1996. "Inflation, Asset Prices, and the Term Structure of Interest Rates in Monetary Economies," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, pages 241-275.
    7. K.J. Martijn Cremers & Joost Driessen & Pascal Maenhout, 2008. "Explaining the Level of Credit Spreads: Option-Implied Jump Risk Premia in a Firm Value Model," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(5), pages 2209-2242, September.
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