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Leadership and Progress


  • Allan Meltzer


When World War II ended, the United States took the lead in providing political stability, rules for freer trade, and international financial stability. The ‘Pax Americana’ worked extremely well. During the postwar years, more people in more countries increased their living standards by larger amounts than in any period in recorded history. In order to continue the global growth, increased liberty and human progress of the last 60 years, Allan Meltzer argues that new arrangements are called for to provide the public goods that progress requires. Developing these new arrangements is the major challenge to US leadership as the engine of world progress in the new century.

Suggested Citation

  • Allan Meltzer, 2003. "Leadership and Progress," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 4(3), pages 15-26, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wej:wldecn:147

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fearon, James D., 1995. "Rationalist explanations for war," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(03), pages 379-414, June.
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    4. Albert Breton & Gianluigi Galeotti & Pierre Salmon & Ronald Wintrobe, 1995. "Nationalism and Rationality," Post-Print hal-00445587, HAL.
    5. Katz, Michael L & Shapiro, Carl, 1985. "Network Externalities, Competition, and Compatibility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 424-440, June.
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    7. Wintrobe,Ronald, 1998. "The Political Economy of Dictatorship," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521583299, March.
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