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Matching survey and administrative data for studying poverty at the local level

Author

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  • Alessandra Coli

    () (Dipartimento di Economia e Management, Universita` degli Studi di Pisa)

Abstract

Official statistics do not generally provide poverty statistics for detailed geographic areas. However, local government needs reliable data to design effective policies and actions against poverty and social exclusion. On the other hand, local government agencies usually have access to a wealth of administrative data which can help computing useful statistics. Survey and administrative data combined can produce a synthetic and yet more complete view on the economic well-being of people. This paper deals with the matching of survey and administrative data on individual income at a local level. An application is given for the Province of Pisa for the year 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandra Coli, 2012. "Matching survey and administrative data for studying poverty at the local level," Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, Vita e Pensiero, Pubblicazioni dell'Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, vol. 120(1), pages 107-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:vep:journl:y:2012:v:120:i:1:p:107-116
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    data integration; record linkage; local income indicators;

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance

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