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The Cost of Electric Power Interruptions in the Industrial Sector: Estimates Derived from Interruptible Service Programs


  • Douglas W. Caves
  • Joseph A. Herriges
  • Robert J. Windle


The electric power industry has become increasingly interested in the value customers place upon service reliability, with the demand for reliability couched in terms of outage or shortage costs. The survey-based method of eliciting these costs dominates the literature. This paper explores and demonstrates a method for estimating outage and shortage costs based upon behavioral data. A discrete choice model is developed for estimating shortage costs using observed decisions of industrial customers regarding participation in interruptible service programs. The resulting shortage cost estimates of $4 per kWh unserved for a one-hour interruption are consistent with previous survey-based estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas W. Caves & Joseph A. Herriges & Robert J. Windle, 1992. "The Cost of Electric Power Interruptions in the Industrial Sector: Estimates Derived from Interruptible Service Programs," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(1), pages 49-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:68:y:1992:i:1:p:49-61

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Clementina Bruno & Ugo Finardi & Azahara Lorite-Espejo & Elena Ragazzi, 2016. "Emerging costs deriving from blackouts for individual firms: evidence from an Italian case study," quaderni IRCrES 201601, Research Institute on Sustainable Economic Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY - former Institute for Economic Research on Firms and Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY.
    2. Pepermans, Guido, 2011. "The value of continuous power supply for Flemish households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7853-7864.
    3. Adam Rose, 2015. "Macroeconomic consequences of terrorist attacks: estimation for the analysis of policies and rules," Chapters,in: Benefit–Cost Analyses for Security Policies, chapter 8, pages 172-200 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Abrate, Graziano & Bruno, Clementina & Erbetta, Fabrizio & Fraquelli, Giovanni & Lorite-Espejo, Azahara, 2016. "A choice experiment on the willingness of households to accept power outages," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(PB), pages 151-164.
    5. Becker, Sophia & Schober, Dominik & Wassermann, Sandra, 2016. "How to approach consumers’ nonmonetary evaluation of electricity supply security? The case of Germany from a multidisciplinary perspective," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 74-84.
    6. Jacopo Torriti & Philipp Grunewald, 2014. "Demand Side Response: Patterns in Europe and Future Policy Perspectives under Capacity Mechanisms," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    7. Kim, Kayoung & Cho, Youngsang, 2017. "Estimation of power outage costs in the industrial sector of South Korea," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 236-245.
    8. de Nooij, Michiel & Koopmans, Carl & Bijvoet, Carlijn, 2007. "The value of supply security: The costs of power interruptions: Economic input for damage reduction and investment in networks," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 277-295, March.
    9. de Nooij, Michiel & Baarsma, Barbara & Bloemhof, Gabriël & Slootweg, Han & Dijk, Harold, 2010. "Development and application of a cost-benefit framework for energy reliability: Using probabilistic methods in network planning and regulation to enhance social welfare: The N-1 rule," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1277-1282, November.
    10. repec:aen:journl:ej38-4-oseni is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Klaus Moeltner & David F. Layton, 2002. "A Censored Random Coefficients Model For Pooled Survey Data With Application To The Estimation Of Power Outage Costs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 552-561, August.
    12. Röpke, Luise, 2013. "The development of renewable energies and supply security: A trade-off analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1011-1021.
    13. Lamessa Tariku ABDISA, 2018. "Power Outages, its Economic Cost and Firm Performance: Evidence from Ethiopia," Departmental Working Papers 2018-01, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    14. Lassana Cissokho, 2015. "Power Outages and the Productivity of Small and Medium Enterprises: the role of Formality," EcoMod2015 8239, EcoMod.
    15. Steinbuks, J. & Foster, V., 2010. "When do firms generate? Evidence on in-house electricity supply in Africa," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 505-514, May.

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