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Gender Segregation in Small Firms

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  • William J. Carrington
  • Kenneth R. Troske

Abstract

This paper studies interfirm gender segregation in a unique sample of small employers. We find that interfirm segregation is prevalent among small employers, as men and women rarely work in fully integrated firms. We also find that the education and sex of the business owner strongly influence the sex composition of a firm's workforce. Finally, we estimate that interfirm segregation can account for up to 50 percent of the gender gap in annual earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • William J. Carrington & Kenneth R. Troske, 1995. "Gender Segregation in Small Firms," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 503-533.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:3:p:503-533
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Baker, Michael & Fortin, Nicole, 2000. "The Gender Composition and Wages: Why is Canada Different from the United States?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000140e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Carrington, William J & Troske, Kenneth R, 1998. "Interfirm Segregation and the Black/White Wage Gap," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 231-260, April.
    3. Leo Kaas, 2009. "Does Equal Pay Legislation Reduce Labour Market Inequality?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 111(1), pages 51-71, March.
    4. Michael Baker & Nicole M. Fortin, 1998. "Gender Composition and Wages: Why Is Canada Different from the United States?," CIRANO Working Papers 98s-34, CIRANO.
    5. Diego F. Angel-Urdinola & Quentin Wodon, 2006. "The Gender Wage Gap and Poverty in Colombia," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(4), pages 721-739, December.
    6. Kurtulus, Fidan Ana & Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald, 2012. "Do Women Top Managers Help Women Advance? A Panel Study Using EEO-1 Records," IZA Discussion Papers 6444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Olof Åslund & Lena Hensvik & Oskar Nordström Skans, 2014. "Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 405-441.
    8. Francine Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States over the 1970s and 1980s," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 29-71.
    9. William J. Carrington & Kenneth R. Troske, 1998. "Sex Segregation in U.S. Manufacturing," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(3), pages 445-464, April.
    10. Michael Baker & Nicole Fortin, 2000. "Comparable Worth Comes to the Private Sector: The Case of Ontario," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0266, Econometric Society.
    11. Nordman, Christophe Jalil & Sarr, Leopold & Sharma, Smriti, 2015. "Cognitive, Non-Cognitive Skills and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data in Bangladesh," IZA Discussion Papers 9132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Hassink, Wolter & Russo, Giovanni, 2010. "The Glass Door: The Gender Composition of Newly-Hired Workers Across Hierarchical Job Levels," IZA Discussion Papers 4858, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Russo, Giovanni & van Ommeren, Jos N, 1998. "Gender Differences in Recruitment Outcomes," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 155-166, April.
    14. Gerds, Marcel, 2012. "Requirements towards and Discrimination against Agricultural Workers – Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment among East German Farms," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(2), June.
    15. Michael Baker & Nicole M. Fortin, 2001. "Occupational gender composition and wages in Canada, 1987-1988," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 345-376, May.
    16. Hutchens, Robert, 2001. "Numerical measures of segregation: desirable properties and their implications," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 13-29, July.
    17. José A. Pagán & Miren Ullibarri, 2000. "Group Heterogeneity and the Gender Earnings Gap in Mexico," Economía Mexicana NUEVA ÉPOCA, , vol. 0(1), pages 23-40, January-J.

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