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The Labor-Supply Effects and Costs of Alternative Negative Income Tax Programs

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Listed:
  • Michael C. Keeley
  • Philip K. Robins
  • Robert G. Spiegelman
  • Richard W. West

Abstract

Results from the Seattle and Denver Income Maintenance Experiments are used to predict nationwide labor-supply effects and costs of six alternative negative income tax programs. To make the predictions, a labor-supply model parameterizing the experimental treatments is estimated using experimental data. The parameters of this model are introduced into a microsimulation model called Microanalysis of Transfers to Households (MATH). The simulations employ the March 1975 Current Population Survey (CPS), which is a weighted random sample of the U.S. population. The simulations are performed within a partial equilibrium framework under the assumption that the demand for low-income labor is perfectly elastic. The simulation results indicate that coverage, costs, and labor-supply effects of a national NIT program vary widely with the parameters of the program.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael C. Keeley & Philip K. Robins & Robert G. Spiegelman & Richard W. West, 1978. "The Labor-Supply Effects and Costs of Alternative Negative Income Tax Programs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 13(1), pages 3-36.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:13:y:1978:i:1:p:3-36
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    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca M. Blank & David Card & Philip K. Robins, 1999. "Financial Incentives for Increasing Work and Income Among Low- Income Families," HEW 9902002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Hua He & Xuenan Mi & Jerry Cornell & Wan Tang & Tanika Kelly & Hui Shen & Hongwen Deng & Yan Du, 2020. "Statistical Issues on Analysis of Censored Data Due to Detection Limit," International Journal of Statistics and Probability, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(4), pages 1-49, July.
    3. Eugenia Muchnik & Isabel Vial & Andreas Strüver & Bettina Harbart, 1991. "Oferta de Trabajo Femenino en Santiago," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 28(85), pages 463-490.
    4. Robert F. Kelly, 1985. "Family Policy Analysis," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 13(3), pages 363-386, February.
    5. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:3-102 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Charles Michalopoulos & Philip K. Robins, 2001. "Using financial incentives to encourage welfare recipients to become economically self-sufficient," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 105-123.

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