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The Monetary Policy Reaction Function: Evidence from Asean-3


  • Pei-Tha, Gan

    () (Faculty of Management and Economics Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak, Malaysia)

  • Kian-Teng, Kwek

    (Faculty of Economics and Administration University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)


The aim of this paper is to determine the central bank's reaction process. Our estimation of this process uses the extension of structural vector autoregression (SVAR) modelling based on the Svensson (2000) method. The idea that monetary policy is not only concerned with the output gap and inflation, but also with external variables, constitutes the basis for the analysis. Using data from Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, the empirical results indicate that the selected countries do care about inflation and the output gap. This is consistent with the central banks' position that: (i) price stability is the most important objective of monetary policy, (ii) the exchange rates and terms of trade, which impact central bank actions, are not, in reality, considered monetary policy objectives and (iii) interest rates are a useful measure for the monetary authorities' counter-cyclical policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Pei-Tha, Gan & Kian-Teng, Kwek, 2010. "The Monetary Policy Reaction Function: Evidence from Asean-3," Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance (AAMJAF), Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, vol. 6(1), pages 1-24.
  • Handle: RePEc:usm:journl:aamjaf00601_1-24

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, March.
    2. Chordia, Tarun & Roll, Richard & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2008. "Liquidity and market efficiency," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 249-268, February.
    3. Goldstein, Michael A. & A. Kavajecz, Kenneth, 2000. "Eighths, sixteenths, and market depth: changes in tick size and liquidity provision on the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 125-149, April.
    4. David C. Porter & Daniel G. Weaver, 1997. "Tick Size and Market Quality," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 26(4), Winter.
    5. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Rydge, James, 2006. "The current state of Asia-Pacific stock exchanges: A critical review of market design," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-32, January.
    6. Pantisa Pavabutr & Sukanya Prangwattananon, 2009. "Tick size change on the Stock Exchange of Thailand," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 351-371, May.
    7. Ahn, Hee-Joon & Cai, Jun & Chan, Kalok & Hamao, Yasushi, 2007. "Tick size change and liquidity provision on the Tokyo Stock Exchange," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 173-194, June.
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