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Primary Products and Economic Growth: An Empirical Measurement

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  • Edward J. Chambers
  • Donald F. Gordon

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Edward J. Chambers & Donald F. Gordon, 1966. "Primary Products and Economic Growth: An Empirical Measurement," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 315-315.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:74:y:1966:p:315
    DOI: 10.1086/259176
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen T. Easton, 1989. "Free Trade, Nationalism, And The Common Man: The Free Trade Agreement Between Canada And The United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 7(3), pages 61-77, July.
    2. Abdelkader Sid Ahmed, 1988. "Vers une théorie de l'industrialisation à partir de l'exportation et de la transformation des ressources naturelles: de la « staple theory » à la rente pétrolière," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 29(115), pages 715-812.
    3. Barbier,Edward B., 2007. "Natural Resources and Economic Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521706513, May.
    4. R. M. McInnis, 1986. "Output and Productivity in Canadian Agriculture, 1870-71 to 1926-27," NBER Chapters,in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 737-778 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Green, Alan G. & Sparks, Gordon R., 1999. "Population Growth and the Dynamics of Canadian Development: A Multivariate Time Series Approach," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 56-71, January.
    6. Boyce, John R. & Herbert Emery, J.C., 2011. "Is a negative correlation between resource abundance and growth sufficient evidence that there is a "resource curse"?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 1-13, March.
    7. Edward B. Barbier, 2005. "Frontier Expansion and Economic Development," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(2), pages 286-303, April.
    8. repec:eee:foreco:v:28:y:2017:i:c:p:49-62 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Michael D. Bordo & Angela Redish, 2003. "Is Deflation depressing? Evidence from the Classical Gold Standard," NBER Working Papers 9520, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ian Keay, 2010. "The Impact of Commodity Price Volatility on Resource Intensive Economies," Working Papers 1274, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    11. Edward Barbier, 2007. "Frontiers and sustainable economic development," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(1), pages 271-295, May.
    12. Henry Willebald & Marc Badia-Miró & Vicente Pinilla, 2015. "Natural Resources and Economic Development. Some lessons from History," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1504, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    13. Philip R. P. Coelho & Daniel B. Klein & James E. McClure, 2004. "Fashion Cycles in Economics," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 1(3), pages 437-454, December.
    14. Stuart J. Wilson, 2003. "A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis of Migration and Capital Formation: The Case of Canada," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(2), pages 455-481, April.
    15. Di Matteo, Livio, 2013. "Women, wealth and economic change: An assessment of the impact of women's property law in Wentworth County, Ontario, 1872–1927," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 285-307.
    16. Livio Di Matteo & J.C. Herbert Emery & Ryan English, 2006. "Is it Better to Live in a Basement, an Attic or to Get your own Place? Analyzing the Costs and Benefits of Institutional Change for Northwestern Ontario," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(2), pages 173-196, June.
    17. David Greasley & Les Oxley, 2009. "The pastoral boom, the rural land market, and long swings in New Zealand economic growth, 1873-1939 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(2), pages 324-349, May.
    18. Hamdad, Malika & Harchaoui, Tarek M., 2004. "La persistance des chocs au Canada, 1870-1996," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(2), pages 421-437, Juin-Sept.

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