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The Impact of Institutional Investors on the Monday Seasonal

Author

Listed:
  • Su Han Chan

    (Department of Finance, California State University-Fullerton)

  • Wai-Kin Leung

    (Faculty of Business Administration, Chinese University of Hong Kong)

  • Ko Wang

    (Department of Finance, California State University-Fullerton)

Abstract

It is well documented that the mean Monday return is significantly negative and is lower than the mean return on other weekdays. Using institutional stock holdings information during the 19811998 period, we document that the Monday seasonal is stronger in stocks with low institutional holdings and that the Monday return is not significantly different from the mean Tuesday to Friday returns for stocks with high institutional holdings during the 19901998 period. Our study provides direct evidence to support the belief that the Monday seasonal may be related to the trading activities of less sophisticated individual investors.

Suggested Citation

  • Su Han Chan & Wai-Kin Leung & Ko Wang, 2004. "The Impact of Institutional Investors on the Monday Seasonal," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(4), pages 967-986, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:77:y:2004:i:4:p:967-986
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Wang, 2011. "Transient institutional investors and insider trading signals," International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 118-145, June.
    2. Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Cunado, Juncal & de Gracia, Fernando Perez, 2013. "Salient features of dependence in daily US stock market indices," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 392(15), pages 3198-3212.
    3. Bohl, Martin T. & Schuppli, Michael & Siklos, Pierre L., 2010. "Stock return seasonalities and investor structure: Evidence from China's B-share markets," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 190-201, March.
    4. Matti Keloharju & Juhani T. Linnainmaa & Peter Nyberg, 2014. "Common Factors in Return Seasonalities," NBER Working Papers 20815, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Steven Huddart & Mark Lang & Michelle H. Yetman, 2009. "Volume and Price Patterns Around a Stock's 52-Week Highs and Lows: Theory and Evidence," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(1), pages 16-31, January.
    6. Mehmet Akbulut & Su Han Chan & Mariya Letdin, 2015. "Calendar Anomalies: Do REITs Behave Like Stocks?," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(2), pages 177-215.
    7. Gao, Pengjie & Hao, Jia & Kalcheva, Ivalina & Ma, Tongshu, 2015. "Short sales and the weekend effect—Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 85-102.
    8. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin & Pál, Rozália, 2006. "Institutional investors and stock market efficiency: The case of the January anomaly," MPRA Paper 677, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2006.
    9. Levy, Tamir & Yagil, Joseph, 2012. "The week-of-the-year effect: Evidence from around the globe," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1963-1974.
    10. Doyle, John R. & Chen, Catherine Huirong, 2009. "The wandering weekday effect in major stock markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1388-1399, August.
    11. Kazemi, Hossein S. & Zhai, Weili & He, Jibao & Cai, Jinghan, 2013. "Stock Market Volatility, Speculative Short Sellers and Weekend Effect: International Evidence," MPRA Paper 54185, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Jul 2013.
    12. Krzysztof Borowski, 2015. "Analysis of the Weekend Effect on the Markets of 121 Equity Indices and 29 Commodities," Eurasian Journal of Business and Management, Eurasian Publications, vol. 3(4), pages 23-35.
    13. repec:eee:jeborg:v:148:y:2018:i:c:p:46-65 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Lepori, Gabriele M., 2015. "Positive mood and investment decisions: Evidence from comedy movie attendance in the U.S," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 142-163.
    15. Bohl, Martin T. & Gottschalk, Katrin & Henke, Harald & Pál, Rozália, 2006. "Institutional investors and stock market efficiency: The case of the January anomaly," Working Paper Series 2006,6, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), The Postgraduate Research Programme Capital Markets and Finance in the Enlarged Europe.
    16. Venezia, Itzhak & Shapira, Zur, 2007. "On the behavioral differences between professional and amateur investors after the weekend," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1417-1426, May.
    17. Jinghan Cai & Jibao He & Le Xia & Weili Zhai, 2017. "Weekend Effect and Short Sales: Evidence from Hong Kong," International Journal of Economics and Financial Research, Academic Research Publishing Group, vol. 3(2), pages 8-18, 02-2017.
    18. Jonathan Wiley & Leonard Zumpano, 2009. "Institutional Investment and the Turn-of-the-Month Effect: Evidence from REITs," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 180-201, August.
    19. Shiu, Yih-Wen & Lee, Chun I. & Gleason, Kimberly C., 2014. "Institutional shareholdings and the January effects in Taiwan," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 49-66.

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