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Overzealous Rule Makers

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Listed:
  • Stefano Barbieri
  • Kai A. Konrad

Abstract

Excessively tight and biased policy choices of rule makers can be explained as outcomes of competition among rule makers with overlapping competencies and diverging perceptions about the optimal framework. Rule makers who have extreme rather than moderate preferences are more likely to take policy action and preempt others, even if their cost of action is very high. This can lead to actionism, excessive regulatory activity, and radical rule outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Barbieri & Kai A. Konrad, 2021. "Overzealous Rule Makers," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 341-365.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:doi:10.1086/711354
    DOI: 10.1086/711354
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    Cited by:

    1. Robin Christmann & Roland Kirstein, 2023. "You go first!: coordination problems and the burden of proof in inquisitorial prosecution," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 403-422, October.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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