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Intermediaries in International Trade: Products and Destinations

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew B. Bernard

    () (Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth)

  • Marco Grazzi

    () (University of Bologna)

  • Chiara Tomasi

    () (Università degli Studi di Trento)

Abstract

This paper examines the factors that give rise to intermediaries in exporting and explores the implications for trade volumes. Export intermediaries such as wholesalers serve different markets and export different products than manufacturing exporters do. Wholesalers are more prevalent in markets with higher destination-specific fixed costs and focus on products that are less differentiated, have lower contract intensity, and have large sunk entry costs. Aggregate exports to destinations with high shares of indirect exports are less responsive to changes in the real exchange rate than are exports to markets served primarily by direct exporters.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew B. Bernard & Marco Grazzi & Chiara Tomasi, 2015. "Intermediaries in International Trade: Products and Destinations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(4), pages 916-920, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:97:y:2015:i:4:p:916-920
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessia Lo Turco & Daniela Maggioni, 2017. "“Glocal” ties: banking development and SEs’ export entry," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 999-1020, April.
    2. Berman, Nicolas & Berthou, Antoine & Héricourt, Jérôme, 2015. "Export dynamics and sales at home," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 298-310.
    3. Eckel, Carsten & Riezman, Raymond, 2016. "CATs and DOGs," CEPR Discussion Papers 11695, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. S. Bolatto & M. Grazzi & C. Tomasi, 2017. "Export intermediaries and adjustments to exchange rate movements," Working Papers wp2004, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. William W. Olney, 2016. "Impact Of Corruption On Firm-Level Export Decisions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1105-1127, April.
    6. Carl Gaigné & Karine Latouche & Stéphane Turolla, 2015. "Vertical ownership and export performance: firm-level evidence from France," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 15-07, INRA UMR SMART-LERECO.
    7. Lin, Faqin & Hu, Cui & Fuchs, Andreas, 2016. "How Do Firms Respond to Political Tensions? The Heterogeneity of the Dalai Lama Effect on Trade," Working Papers 0628, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    8. Angelo Secchi & Federico Tamagni & Chiara Tomasi, 2016. "Financial constraints and firm exports: accounting for heterogeneity, self-selection, and endogeneity," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(5), pages 813-827.
    9. Marco Grazzi & Nanditha Mathew & Daniele Moschella, 2017. "Efficiency, innovation, and imported inputs: determinants of export performance among Indian manufacturing firms," LEM Papers Series 2017/09, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    10. Marco Grazzi & Chiara Tomasi, 2016. "Indirect exporters and importers," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(2), pages 251-281, May.
    11. Federico Ciliberto & Ina C. Jäkel, 2017. "Exporter Price Premia?," Economics Working Papers 2017-09, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    12. Dosi, Giovanni & Grazzi, Marco & Moschella, Daniele, 2015. "Technology and costs in international competitiveness: From countries and sectors to firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 1795-1814.
    13. Jackie M.L. Chan, 2015. "Trade Intermediation, Financial Frictions, and the Gains from Trade," Discussion Papers 15-009, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    14. Christian Volpe Martincus, 2016. "Out of the Border Labyrinth: An Assessment of Trade Facilitation Initiatives in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 96856, February.
    15. repec:idb:idbbks:7994 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Jerónimo Carballo & Georg Schaur & Christian Volpe Martincus, 2016. "Posts as Trade Facilitators," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7681, Inter-American Development Bank.
    17. Marco Grazzi & Daniele Moschella, 2018. "Small, young, and exporters: New evidence on the determinants of firm growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 125-152, January.
    18. Giovanni Dosi & Marco Grazzi & Daniele Moschella, 2017. "What do firms know? What do they produce? A new look at the relationship between patenting profiles and patterns of product diversification," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 413-429, February.
    19. repec:eee:eecrev:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:68-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Stefano Bolatto & Marco Grazzi & Chiara Tomasi, 2018. "Export Modes and Adjustments to Exchange Rate Movements," DEM Working Papers 2018/02, Department of Economics and Management.
    21. Marco Grazzi & Chiara Tomasi, 2014. "Productivity Sorting and Mode of Export," LEM Papers Series 2014/25, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    22. Nicolas Berman & Alan Asprilla & Olivier Cadot & Mélise Jaud, 2015. "Pricing-to-market, Trade Policy, and Market Power," IHEID Working Papers 04-2015, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    23. OKUBO Toshihiro & ONO Yukako & SAITO Yukiko, 2014. "Roles of Wholesalers in Transaction Networks," Discussion papers 14059, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    24. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:778-793 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    heterogeneous firms; international trade; intermediation; wholesalers; export entry costs;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure

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