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How Does the Border Affect Productivity? Evidence from American and Canadian Manufacturing Industries

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  • Robert Vigfusson

    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

Abstract

This study reports on how much productivity fluctuations are industry specific versus country specific. For the manufacturing industries in Canada and the United States, the correlation between cross-border pairings of the same industry are found to be more often highly correlated than previously thought. Furthermore, the study confirms earlier findings that the similarity of input use can help describe the comovement of productivity fluctuations across industries. Copyright by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Vigfusson, 2008. "How Does the Border Affect Productivity? Evidence from American and Canadian Manufacturing Industries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 49-64, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:90:y:2008:i:1:p:49-64
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    Cited by:

    1. Stella, Andrea, 2015. "Firm dynamics and the origins of aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 71-88.
    2. Richard Blundell & Martin Browning & Ian Crawford, 2008. "Best Nonparametric Bounds on Demand Responses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 1227-1262.
    3. Jørn Rattsø & Torfinn Harding, 2009. "Looking Abroad, but Lagging Behind: How the World Technology Frontier Affects South Africa," Working Paper Series 10209, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    4. Conley, Timothy G. & Molinari, Francesca, 2007. "Spatial correlation robust inference with errors in location or distance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 76-96, September.

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