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Risk Sharing Within The United States: What Do Financial Markets And Fiscal Federalism Accomplish?

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  • Stefano G. Athanasoulis
  • Eric van Wincoop

Abstract

We measure income uncertainty at the level of U.S. states, and the extent to which it has been reduced through risksharing, using a method recently developed by Athanasoulis and van Wincoop (2000). Risk is measured as the standard deviation of state-specific income growth uncertainty, measured by using the error term of a regression of income growth on variables in the information set. Risk sharing is measured by the extent to which this standard deviation has been reduced through financial markets and federal fiscal policy. The advantage of this measure over the existing risk sharing literature is that the interpretation does not depend on many auxiliary assumptions. Our findings on the extent of risk sharing are insensitive to the only assumption we need to make, the variables that are in the information set. We find that the standard deviation of state-specific income growth uncertainty is reduced by less than half through financial markets and federal fiscal policy. We show that the extent of risk sharing would be much higher if agents held better diversified portfolios across the states. © 2001 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano G. Athanasoulis & Eric van Wincoop, 2001. "Risk Sharing Within The United States: What Do Financial Markets And Fiscal Federalism Accomplish?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(4), pages 688-698, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:83:y:2001:i:4:p:688-698
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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Furceri & Aleksandra Zdzienicka, 2015. "The Euro Area Crisis: Need for a Supranational Fiscal Risk Sharing Mechanism?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 683-710, September.
    2. Ralf Hepp & Jürgen von Hagen, 2012. "Fiscal Federalism in Germany: Stabilization and Redistribution Before and After Unification," Publius: The Journal of Federalism, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(2), pages 234-259, April.
    3. Viktoria Hnatkovska & Michael Devereux, 2011. "Consumption Risk Sharing, the Real Exchange Rate, and Borders: Why Does the Exchange Rate Make Such a Difference?," 2011 Meeting Papers 1027, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Attilio Gardini & Giuseppe Cavaliere & Luca Fanelli, 2005. "Risk Sharing, avversione al rischio e stabilizzazione delle economie regionali in Italia," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 95(3), pages 219-266, May-June.
    5. Belke, Ansgar & Gros, Daniel, 2015. "Banking Union as a Shock Absorber," Ruhr Economic Papers 548, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. repec:zbw:rwirep:0548 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Filippo Gori, 2013. "Monetary Policy and Real Cost Imbalances in Currency Unions," IHEID Working Papers 12-2014, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised 12 Feb 2014.
    8. Stephane Pallage & Michel A. Robe, 2002. "The States vs. the states: On the Welfare Cost of Business Cycles in the U.S," Cahiers de recherche du Département des sciences économiques, UQAM 20-17, Université du Québec à Montréal, Département des sciences économiques, revised Oct 2002.
    9. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R., 2003. "Emerging markets finance," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1-2), pages 3-56, February.
    10. Ansgar Belke & Daniel Gros, 2015. "Banking Union as a Shock Absorber," Ruhr Economic Papers 0548, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Ansgar Belke & Daniel Gros, 2016. "On the Shock-Absorbing Properties of a Banking Union: Europe Compared with the United States," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 58(3), pages 359-386, September.
    12. Masagus M. Ridhwan & Henri L. F. Groot & Piet Rietveld & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "The Regional Impact of Monetary Policy in Indonesia," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 240-262, June.
    13. Furstenberg, George M. von, 2006. "Consumption smoothing across states and time: International insurance versus foreign loans," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-23, January.
    14. Ho, Chun-Yu & Ho, Wai-Yip Alex & Li, Dan, 2010. "Consumption Fluctuations and Welfare: Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1315-1327, September.
    15. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R. & Lundblad, Christian, 2006. "Growth volatility and financial liberalization," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 370-403, April.
    16. Giroud, Xavier & Mueller, Holger M, 2016. "Redistribution of Local Demand Shocks through Firms' Internal Networks," CEPR Discussion Papers 11384, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R., 2002. "Research in emerging markets finance: looking to the future," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 429-448, December.
    18. George M. Korniotis & Alok Kumar, 2008. "Do behavioral biases adversely affect the macro-economy?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-49, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    19. Ding, Xiaoya (Sara) & Ni, Yang & Rahman, Abdul & Saadi, Samir, 2015. "Housing price growth and the cost of equity capital," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 283-300.

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