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Does the Baseball Labor Market Contradict the Human Capital Model of Investment?

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  • Blass, Asher A

Abstract

This paper examines whether experienced players in Major League Baseball are paid more than their contribution to team revenue. The author shows that wages increase with experience independently of productivity gains. The results, therefore, contradict the human capital model of investment. The evidence is in fact consistent with implicit contract models because most older players are relatively overpaid. Copyright 1992 by MIT Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Blass, Asher A, 1992. "Does the Baseball Labor Market Contradict the Human Capital Model of Investment?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 261-268, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:74:y:1992:i:2:p:261-68
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles F. Manski, 1989. "Anatomy of the Selection Problem," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 343-360.
    2. Lillard, Lee & Smith, James P & Welch, Finis, 1986. "What Do We Really Know about Wages? The Importance of Nonreporting and Census Imputation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 489-506, June.
    3. O'Neill, June, 1990. "The Role of Human Capital in Earnings Differences between Black and White Men," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 25-45.
    4. Reimers, Cordelia W, 1983. "Labor Market Discrimination against Hispanic and Black Men," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 570-579.
    5. Richard Butler & James J. Heckman, 1977. "The Government's Impact on the Labor Market Status of Black Americans: A Critical Review," NBER Working Papers 0183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
    7. William Darity, 1980. "Illusions of black economic progress," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, pages 153-168.
    8. James P. Smith, 2004. "The Convergence to Racial Equality in Women's Wages," Labor and Demography 0402011, EconWPA.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Clayton & David Yermack, 1999. "Major League Baseball Player Contracts: An Investigation of the Empirical Properties of Real Options," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 99-051, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
    2. Aya S. Chacar & William Hesterly, 2008. "Institutional settings and rent appropriation by knowledge-based employees: the case of Major League Baseball," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2-3), pages 117-136.
    3. Egon Franck & Stephan Nüesch, 2007. "Wage Dispersion and Team Performance - An Empirical Panel Analysis," Working Papers 0073, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
    4. Carolyn Pitchik, 2008. "Self-Promoting Investments," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 164(3), pages 381-406, September.
    5. David J. Berri, 1999. "Who is 'most valuable'? Measuring the player's production of wins in the National Basketball Association," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 411-427.
    6. Christopher R. Bollinger & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2003. "The Upside Potential of Hiring Risky Workers: Evidence from the Baseball Industry," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(4), pages 923-944, October.
    7. Papps, Kerry L., 2010. "Productivity under Large Pay Increases: Evidence from Professional Baseball," IZA Discussion Papers 5133, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Martin Schmidt & David Berri, 2002. "Competitive Balance and Market Size in Major League Baseball: A Response to Baseball's Blue Ribbon Panel," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 21(1), pages 41-54, August.
    9. Olivier Gergaud & Vincenzo Verardi, 2006. "Untalented but Successful," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00112423, HAL.
    10. Andrew Hughes & Cory Koedel & Joshua A. Price, 2015. "Positional WAR in the National Football League," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 16(6), pages 597-613, August.
    11. Egon Franck & Stephan Nüesch, 2012. "Talent And/Or Popularity: What Does It Take To Be A Superstar?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 202-216, January.
    12. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00112423 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Berri, David J. & Schmidt, Martin B., 2002. "Instrumental versus bounded rationality: a comparison of Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 191-214.
    14. D Berri & R Simmons, 2007. "Race and the evaluation of signal callers in the national football league," Working Papers 591147, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

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