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Estimating the Benefits of Traffic Calming on Through Routes: A Choice Experiment Approach


  • Guy D. Garrod
  • Riccardo Scarpa
  • Kenneth G. Willis


Excessive speed is a major contributory factor in a large proportion of deaths and serious injuries on British roads. One approach to tackling the speeding problem is the use of traffic calming measures as a means of enforcing speed restrictions along roads running through populated areas. But speed reduction is only one of the benefits of traffic calming. This paper reports the results from a choice experiment used to investigate the willingness to pay (WTP) of a sample of local residents in three English towns for traffic calming measures that would achieve a range of reductions in speed, noise and community severance. Estimations from the responses revealed that local people had a positive willingness to pay for a reduction in the negative impacts of road traffic and for more attractive, rather than basic, designs of the traffic calming measures. © The London School of Economics and the University of Bath 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Guy D. Garrod & Riccardo Scarpa & Kenneth G. Willis, 2002. "Estimating the Benefits of Traffic Calming on Through Routes: A Choice Experiment Approach," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 36(2), pages 211-231, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpe:jtecpo:v:36:y:2002:i:2:p:211-231

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    Cited by:

    1. Kikulwe, Enoch M. & Birol, Ekin & Wesseler, Justus & Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin, 2013. "Benefits, costs, and consumer perceptions of the potential introduction of a fungus-resistant banana in Uganda and policy implications," IFPRI book chapters,in: Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Gruère, Guillaume P. & Sithole-Niang, Idah (ed.), Genetically modified crops in Africa: Economic and policy lessons from countries south of the Sahara, chapter 4, pages 99-141 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Bliemer, Michiel C.J. & Rose, John M. & Hensher, David A., 2009. "Efficient stated choice experiments for estimating nested logit models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 19-35, January.
    3. Marva Stithou & Yiannis Kountouris & Phoebe Koundouri, "undated". "A Choice Experiments Application in Transport Infrastructure: A case study on travel time savings, accidents and pollution reduction," DEOS Working Papers 1116, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    4. Boeri, Marco & Scarpa, Riccardo & Chorus, Caspar G., 2014. "Stated choices and benefit estimates in the context of traffic calming schemes: Utility maximization, regret minimization, or both?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 121-135.
    5. Riccardo Scarpa & George Philippidis & Fiorenza Spalatro, 2005. "Product-country images and preference heterogeneity for Mediterranean food products: A discrete choice framework," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 329-349.
    6. Sotirios Thanos & Mark Wardman & Abigail Bristow, 2011. "Valuing Aircraft Noise: Stated Choice Experiments Reflecting Inter-Temporal Noise Changes from Airport Relocation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 50(4), pages 559-583, December.
    7. Riccardo SCARPA & Fiorenza SPALATRO & Maurizio CANAVARI, 2005. "Investigating Preferences For Environment Friendly Production," Others 0505003, EconWPA.
    8. Ouma, Emily Awuor & Abdulai, Awudu, 2006. "Contribution of Economics to Design of Sustainable Cattle Breeding Programs in Eastern Africa: A Choice Experiment Approach," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25587, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Jesus Barreiro & Mercedes Sanchez & Montserrat Viladrich-Grau, 2005. "How much are people willing to pay for silence? A contingent valuation study," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(11), pages 1233-1246.
    10. Riccardo Scarpa & Susanne Menzel, 2005. "Protection Motivation Theory and Contingent Valuation: Perceived Realism, Threat and WTP Estimates for Biodiversity Protection," Working Papers 2005.26, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    11. Wang, Xuehong & Bennett, Jeff & Xie, Chen & Zhang, Zhitao & Liang, Dan, 2007. "Estimating non-market environmental benefits of the Conversion of Cropland to Forest and Grassland Program: A choice modeling approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 114-125, June.
    12. Scarpa, Riccardo & Spalatro, Fiorenza & Canavari, Maurizio, 2003. "Investigating Preferences For Environment Friendly Production Practices: Taste Segments For Organic And Integrated Crop Management In Italian Households," Working Papers 14467, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
    13. Proost, Stef & Westin, Jonas, 2014. "Race to the top in traffic calming," Working papers in Transport Economics 2014:24, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    14. Bliemer, Michiel C.J. & Rose, John M., 2011. "Experimental design influences on stated choice outputs: An empirical study in air travel choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 63-79, January.
    15. Yao, Richard T. & Scarpa, Riccardo & Turner, James A. & Barnard, Tim D. & Rose, John M. & Palma, João H.N. & Harrison, Duncan R., 2014. "Valuing biodiversity enhancement in New Zealand's planted forests: Socioeconomic and spatial determinants of willingness-to-pay," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 90-101.
    16. Garrod, Guy & Ruto, Eric & Willis, Ken & Powe, Neil, 2012. "Heterogeneity of preferences for the benefits of Environmental Stewardship: A latent-class approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 104-111.

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