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Raising the bar (6)

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Elhorst
  • Maria Abreu
  • Pedro Amaral
  • Arnab Bhattacharjee
  • Luisa Corrado
  • Justin Doran
  • Bernard Fingleton
  • Franz Fuerst
  • Harry Garretsen
  • Danilo Igliori
  • Julie Le Gallo
  • Philip McCann
  • Vassilis Monastiriotis
  • Francesco Quatraro
  • Jihai Yu

Abstract

Raising the bar (6). Spatial Economic Analysis. This editorial summarizes and comments on the papers published in issue 12(4) so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper addresses the question of whether ‘jobs follow people’ or ‘people follow jobs’. The second paper develops a new methodology to determine functional regions. The third paper is a major contribution to the growing literature on new modelling approaches and applications of disaster impact models. The fourth paper focuses on the costs and benefits of higher education. The fifth paper develops a two-step procedure to identify endogenously spatial regimes in the first step using geographically weighted regression, and to account for spatial dependence in the second step. Finally, the sixth paper estimates a dynamic spatial panel data model to explain house prices and to show that restricted housing supply in the city of Cambridge, UK, has some undesirable labour market effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Elhorst & Maria Abreu & Pedro Amaral & Arnab Bhattacharjee & Luisa Corrado & Justin Doran & Bernard Fingleton & Franz Fuerst & Harry Garretsen & Danilo Igliori & Julie Le Gallo & Philip McCann & , 2017. "Raising the bar (6)," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 347-352, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:specan:v:12:y:2017:i:4:p:347-352
    DOI: 10.1080/17421772.2017.1372965
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