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Sir Frank Holmes - Citation for the award of distinguished fellow of the New Zealand association of economists


  • Dennis Rose


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  • Dennis Rose, 2004. "Sir Frank Holmes - Citation for the award of distinguished fellow of the New Zealand association of economists," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2), pages 151-152.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:38:y:2004:i:2:p:151-152 DOI: 10.1080/00779950409544400

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cadsby, Charles Bram & Ratner, Mitchell, 1992. "Turn-of-month and pre-holiday effects on stock returns: Some international evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 497-509, June.
    2. Eugene F. Fama & Kenneth R. French, 2001. "Disappearing Dividends: Changing Firm Characteristics Or Lower Propensity To Pay?," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 14(1), pages 67-79.
    3. Lisa A. Kramer & Mark J. Kamstra & Maurice D. Levi, 2000. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight Saving Anomaly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1005-1011, September.
    4. Campbell, John Y. & Hentschel, Ludger, 1992. "No news is good news *1: An asymmetric model of changing volatility in stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 281-318, June.
    5. David Hirshleifer & Tyler Shumway, 2003. "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(3), pages 1009-1032, June.
    6. Saunders, Edward M, Jr, 1993. "Stock Prices and Wall Street Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1337-1345, December.
    7. Glenn Boyle & Brett Walter, 2003. "Reflected glory and failure: international sporting success and the stock market," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 225-235.
    8. Chen, Nai-Fu & Roll, Richard & Ross, Stephen A, 1986. "Economic Forces and the Stock Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(3), pages 383-403, July.
    9. Glosten, Lawrence R & Jagannathan, Ravi & Runkle, David E, 1993. " On the Relation between the Expected Value and the Volatility of the Nominal Excess Return on Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(5), pages 1779-1801, December.
    10. Paul Brockman & David Michayluk, 1998. "The persistent holiday effect: additional evidence," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 205-209.
    11. Agrawal, Anup & Tandon, Kishore, 1994. "Anomalies or illusions? Evidence from stock markets in eighteen countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 83-106, February.
    12. Dyl, Edward A & Maberly, Edwin D, 1988. " The Anomaly That Isn't There: A Comment on Friday the Thirteenth," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(5), pages 1285-1286, December.
    13. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
    14. J. Andrew Coutts, 1999. "Friday the thirteenth and the Financial Times Industrial Ordinary Shares Index 1935-94," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 35-37.
    15. Newey, Whitney & West, Kenneth, 2014. "A simple, positive semi-definite, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation consistent covariance matrix," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 33(1), pages 125-132.
    16. Kolb, Robert W & Rodriguez, Ricardo J, 1987. " Friday the Thirteenth: 'Part VII'--A Note," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(5), pages 1385-1387, December.
    17. Pettengill, Glenn N, 1989. "Holiday Closings and Security Returns," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 12(1), pages 57-67, Spring.
    18. Brian Lucey, 2000. "Friday the 13th and the philosophical basis of financial economics," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 24(3), pages 294-301, September.
    19. Ariel, Robert A, 1990. " High Stock Returns before Holidays: Existence and Evidence on Possible Causes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(5), pages 1611-1626, December.
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