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Residential satisfaction in inner urban higher-density Brisbane, Australia: role of dwelling design, neighbourhood and neighbours

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  • Laurie Buys
  • Evonne Miller

Abstract

Increasing the population density of urban areas is a key policy strategy to sustainably manage growth, but many residents often view higher-density living as an undesirable long-term housing option. Thus, this research explores the predictors of residential satisfaction in inner urban higher-density (IUHD) environments, surveying 636 IUHD residents in Brisbane, Australia about the importance of dwelling design (34 specific attributes, assessing satisfaction with facilities, upkeep, size, cost, design, surroundings, location, climate and environmental management) and neighbourhood (73 specific attributes, assessing satisfaction with noise, odours, pollution, safety, growth, neighbourhood characteristics, facilities). Ordinal regression modelling identified the specific features of the neighbourhood and dwelling that were critical in predicting residential satisfaction: satisfaction with dwelling position, design and facilities, noise, walkability, safety and condition of local area and social contacts (family, friends, familiar faces) in the neighbourhood. Identifying the factors that influence residential satisfaction in IUHD will assist with both planning and design of such developments, enhancing quality and appeal to help ensure a lower resident turnover rate and facilitate acceptance and uptake of high-density living.

Suggested Citation

  • Laurie Buys & Evonne Miller, 2012. "Residential satisfaction in inner urban higher-density Brisbane, Australia: role of dwelling design, neighbourhood and neighbours," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(3), pages 319-338, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jenpmg:v:55:y:2012:i:3:p:319-338
    DOI: 10.1080/09640568.2011.597592
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/09640568.2011.597592
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    Cited by:

    1. Hamersma, Marije & Tillema, Taede & Sussman, Joseph & Arts, Jos, 2014. "Residential satisfaction close to highways: The impact of accessibility, nuisances and highway adjustment projects," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 106-121.
    2. Sandrine Gaymard & Jimmy Bordarie, 2015. "The Perception of the Ideal Neighborhood: A Preamble to Implementation of a “Street Use Code”," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(3), pages 801-816, February.
    3. Eziyi Ibem & Dolapo Amole, 2013. "Residential Satisfaction in Public Core Housing in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 563-581, August.

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