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Teaching Economics to Business Students through the Lens of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability


  • Sylvia Maxfield


Corporate “social-issues management” courses are often taught without in-depth reference to economics, but they afford an opportunity both to review ground-level microeconomics issues including pricing and profit maximization under different market structures and to introduce more advanced topics such as externalities, introductory game theory, information asymmetry, antitrust law, and network and innovation economics. In a corporate social-issues management course grounded in economics, these concepts can be taught hand-in-glove with their relevance to the practice of corporate citizenship and sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Sylvia Maxfield, 2011. "Teaching Economics to Business Students through the Lens of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 60-69, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:42:y:2011:i:1:p:60-69 DOI: 10.1080/00220485.2011.536490

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    References listed on IDEAS

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