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Financial Regulation in Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • M. Brownbridge
  • C. Kirkpatrick

Abstract

Many LDCs have implemented reforms to strengthen the prudential regulation and supervision of their financial systems. This article examines the progress made by LDCs in implementing reforms, analyses the weaknesses in their prudential systems and discusses policy options for further reform. While considerable improvements have been achieved, the occurrence of banking crises during the 1990s indicates that many countries have yet to build robust prudential systems which can protect their banking systems from systemic crises. The weaknesses include loopholes in the prudential regulations, shortages of skilled supervisors, and regulatory forbearance. Furthermore, there are difficulties in applying the developed country model of regulation, which relies heavily on accurate financial information, highly skilled technicians and an impartial bureaucracy, in an environment characterised by weak accounting and legal frameworks, acute shortages of skilled personnel and pervasive political interference in public administration. Options for further reform include higher capital adequacy standards, explicit rules covering intervention policy in distressed banks, restraints on competition in banking markets and greater use of the market for monitoring banks.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Brownbridge & C. Kirkpatrick, 2000. "Financial Regulation in Developing Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 1-24, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:37:y:2000:i:1:p:1-24
    DOI: 10.1080/713600056
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tony Addison & Alemayehu Geda & Philippe Le Billon & S Mansoob Murshed, 2005. "Reconstructing and Reforming the Financial System in Conflict and 'Post-Conflict' Economies," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 703-718.
    2. Ghamz-e-Ali Siyal & Asma Mohsin & Khalid Zaman, 2014. "Financial Soundness and Pakistan’s Economics Growth: Turn on the Light," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(9), pages 359-371, September.
    3. Elina Ribakova, 2005. "Liberalization, Prudential Supervision, and Capital Requirements; The Policy Trade-Offs," IMF Working Papers 05/136, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Kirkpatrick, Colin & Parker, David, 2003. "Regulatory Impact Assessment: Developing Its Potential for Use in Developing Countries," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30646, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    5. Atsin, Jessica A.L. & Ocran, Matthew K., 2017. "Financial liberalization and the development of stock markets in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 87580, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Steinherr, Alfred & Cisotta, Alessandro & Klar, Erik & Sehovic, Kenan, 2006. "Liberalizing Cross-Border Capital Flows: How Effective Are Institutional Arrangements against Crisis in Southeast Asia," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 6, Asian Development Bank.
    7. David Parker & Colin Kirkpatrick, 2004. "Economic regulation in developing countries: a framework for critical analysis," Chapters,in: Leading Issues in Competition, Regulation and Development, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Finn Tarp, 2003. "Financial liberalization, financial development and economic growth in LDCs," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 189-209.
    9. Jalilian, Hossein & Kirkpatrick, Colin & Parker, David, 2003. "Creating the Conditions for International Business Expansion: The Impact of Regulation on Economic Growth in Developing Countries - A Cross-Country Analysis," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30689, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    10. Kirkpatrick, Colin, 2001. "Regulatory Impact Assessment in Developing Countries: Research Issues," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30640, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    11. Gregory N. Price & Juliet U. Elu, 2014. "Does regional currency integration ameliorate global macroeconomic shocks in sub-Saharan Africa? The case of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 737-750, September.
    12. Clara Garcia, 2004. "Capital Inflows, Policy Responses, and Their Ill Consequences: Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia in the Decade Before the Crises," Working Papers wp81, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    13. Vipin Ghildiyal & A.K. Pokhriyal & Arvind Mohan, 2015. "Impact of Financial Deepening on Economic Growth in Indian Perspective: ARDL Bound Testing Approach to Cointegration," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(3), pages 49-60, September.
    14. Parker, David & Kirkpatrick, Colin, 2002. "Researching Economic Regulation in Developing Countries: Developing a Methodology for Critical Analysis," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30665, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    15. Karima Saci & Gianluigi Giorgioni & Ken Holden, 2009. "Does financial development affect growth?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(13), pages 1701-1707.
    16. repec:eee:riibaf:v:45:y:2018:i:c:p:467-474 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Ilene GRABEL, 2004. "Trip Wires And Speed Bumps: Managing Financial Risks And Reducing The Potential For Financial Crises In Developing Economies," G-24 Discussion Papers 33, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    18. Colin Kirkpatrick & Christopher Green, 2002. "Finance and development: an overview of the issues," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 207-209.
    19. Ilene Grabel, 2003. "Predicting Financial Crisis in Developing Economies: Astronomy or Astrology?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 243-258, Spring.

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