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Retrospective analysis of a school-based malaria treatment programme demonstrates a positive impact on health and education outcomes in Mangochi district, Malawi


  • Bertha Nhlema Simwaka
  • Kisukyabo Simwaka
  • George Bello


This report presents a retrospective evaluation of the school-based malaria treatment programme implemented in Mangochi district, Malawi. The teachers were trained to identify and treat children suffering from malaria. The evaluation was undertaken using the school administrative records. The intervention and comparison schools were matched using propensity score matching. The impact was assessed using generalised linear modelling of family Poisson and also Kaplan-Meier for survival analysis. The results showed significant reductions in general absenteeism and grade repetition by students. Treating the cost-savings arising from the reduced rate of repetition as the benefits of the programme, the study showed that benefits far outweighed costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertha Nhlema Simwaka & Kisukyabo Simwaka & George Bello, 2009. "Retrospective analysis of a school-based malaria treatment programme demonstrates a positive impact on health and education outcomes in Mangochi district, Malawi," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(4), pages 492-506.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:1:y:2009:i:4:p:492-506 DOI: 10.1080/19439340903342336

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas, Ranjeeta & Jones, Andrew M & Squire, Lyn, 2010. "Methods for Evaluating Innovative Health Programs (EIHP): A Multi-Country Study," MPRA Paper 29402, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Squire, Lyn & Jones, Andrew M & Thomas, Ranjeeta, 2010. "Evaluating Innovative Health Programs: Lessons for Health Policy," MPRA Paper 29205, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    school; children; malaria; treatment; repetition; absenteeism;


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