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Globalization and Economic Growth: A Political Economy Analysis for OECD Countries

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  • Chun-Ping Chang
  • Chien-Chiang Lee

Abstract

Globalization is commonly defined as a strict economic path by most previous works, but it is really a fuzzy concept with unrestrained dimensions. While the ideological location of an incumbent political party is a powerful predictor of its policy position, the role of a political party in the globalization-growth nexus has never been fully empirically investigated. By applying Pedroni's panel cointegration technique instead of a time-series or traditional panel data approach, this paper aims to empirically re-examine the co-movement and the causal relationship among economic growth, the overall globalization index, and its three main dimensions—economic, social, as well as political integrations—by using panel data for 23 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries for 1970 to 2006. Certainly, the political party variable is taken into account as the advanced test is promoted, and we finally discover that all variables move together in the long run. Based on the results of the panel causality test, though the evidence of short-run causality is very weak, it does show long-run unidirectional causality running from the overall index of globalization, economic globalization, and social globalization to growth. Finally, the critical role of the political party is deeply discussed in relation with our results.

Suggested Citation

  • Chun-Ping Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee, 2010. "Globalization and Economic Growth: A Political Economy Analysis for OECD Countries," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 151-173.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:glecrv:v:39:y:2010:i:2:p:151-173 DOI: 10.1080/1226508X.2010.483835
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    Cited by:

    1. Tsung-pao Wu & Dian Fan & Tsangyao Chang, 2016. "The Relationship Between Globalization And Military Expenditures In G7 Countries: Evidence From A Panel Data Analysis," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(3), pages 285-302.
    2. Chien-Chiang Lee & Chi-Chuan Lee & Chun-Ping Chang, 2015. "Globalization, Economic Growth and Institutional Development in China," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 31-63.
    3. Buhari Doğan, 2016. "The Effects of Globalization on Employment: Bounds Test Approach in Turkey Sample," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(10), pages 620-633, October.
    4. Chun-Ping Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee & Meng-Chi Hsieh, 2011. "Globalization, Real Output and Multiple Structural Breaks," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 421-444.
    5. Chang, Chun-Ping & Berdiev, Aziz N. & Lee, Chien-Chiang, 2013. "Energy exports, globalization and economic growth: The case of South Caucasus," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 333-346.
    6. Chang, Tsangyao & Cheng, Shu-Ching & Pan, Guochen & Wu, Tsung-pao, 2013. "Does globalization affect the insurance markets? Bootstrap panel Granger causality test," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 254-260.
    7. Chen, Sen-Sung & Cheng, Shu-Ching & Pan, Guochen & Wu, Tsung-Pao, 2013. "The relationship between globalization and insurance activities: A panel data analysis," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 151-157.
    8. Magda Kandil & Muhammad Shahbaz & Mantu Kumar Mahalik & Duc Khuong Nguyen, 2017. "The drivers of economic growth in China and India: globalization or financial development?," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 54-84, April.
    9. Chang, Chun-Ping & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Hsieh, Meng-Chi, 2015. "Does globalization promote real output? Evidence from quantile cointegration regression," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 25-36.
    10. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2014. "Globalization and economic growth: Evidence from two decades of transition in CEE," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 99-107.
    11. Abdolmajid Arfaei Moghaddam & Ma¡¯rof Redzuan, 2012. "Globalization and Economic Growth: A Case Study in a Few Developing Countries (1980-2010)," Research in World Economy, Research in World Economy, Sciedu Press, vol. 3(1), pages 54-62, March.
    12. Jun Wen & Chun-Ping Chang & Jia-Hsi Weng & Jiliang Liu, 2016. "Globalization And Real Gdp: New Evidence Using Panel Vector Autoregression," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-34, December.
    13. Ming Zhong & Tsangyao Chang & Samrat Goswami & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "The Nexus between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in the BRICS and the US: A Bootstrap Panel Causality Test," Working Papers 201449, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    14. Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "The Evidence on Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 509-552, March.

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