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Feminist Economics of Inequality, Development, and Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Gunseli Berik
  • Yana van der Meulen Rodgers
  • Stephanie Seguino

Abstract

This study examines connections between intergroup inequality and macroeconomic outcomes, considering various channels through which gender, growth, and development interact. It upholds the salience not only of equality in opportunities but also equality in outcomes. The contribution argues that inequalities based on gender, race, ethnicity, and class undermine the ability to provision and expand capabilities, and it examines the macroeconomic policies that are likely to promote broadly shared development. It explores how the macroeconomy acts as a structure of constraint in achieving gender equality and in turn how gender relations in areas like education and wage gaps can have macro-level impacts. Further, it underscores that the interaction of the macroeconomy and gender relations depends on the structure of the economy, the nature of job segregation, the particular measure of gender inequality, and a country's international relations. Finally, it outlines policies for promoting gender equality as both an intrinsic goal and a step toward improving well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunseli Berik & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Stephanie Seguino, 2009. "Feminist Economics of Inequality, Development, and Growth," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 1-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:15:y:2009:i:3:p:1-33
    DOI: 10.1080/13545700903093524
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Audi, Marc & Ali, Amjad, 2016. "Gender Gap and Trade Liberalization: An Analysis of some selected SAARC countries," MPRA Paper 83520, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2013. "The Impact Of Gender Wage Gap On Sectoral Economic Growth – Cross-Country Approach," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 8(3), pages 103-122, September.
    3. Eva Fodor & Daniel Horn, 2015. "“Economic development” and gender equality: explaining variations in the gender poverty gap after socialism," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1519, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    4. Marilyn Power, 2013. "A social provisioning approach to gender and economic life," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 1, pages 7-17 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Mariusz Kaszubowski & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2014. "Salary and reservation wage gender gaps in Polish academia," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 19, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    6. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "Impact of the 2008-2009 Food, Fuel, and Financial Crisis On the Philippine Labor Market," Working Papers 17, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    7. van der Meulen Rodgers, Yana & Menon, Nidhiya, 2012. "Impact of the 2008–2009 Twin Economic Crises on the Philippine Labor Market," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2318-2328.
    8. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "Gender Differences in Socioeconomic Status and Health: Evidence from the 2008 Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey," Working Papers 18, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    9. Silvana Maubrigades, 2015. "Connections between women`s age at marriage and social and economic development," Documentos de trabajo 39, Programa de Historia Económica, FCS, Udelar.
    10. Johannes Kruse, 2014. "Women’s representation in the UN climate change negotiations: a quantitative analysis of state delegations, 1995–2011," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 349-370, November.
    11. Seguino, Stephanie, 2011. "Gender Inequality and Economic Growth: A Reply to Schober and Winter-Ebmer," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1485-1487, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Development; growth; inequality; gender; macroeconomic policy; feminist economics; JEL CODES: 04; J3; E0; B54; D30;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • B54 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Feminist Economics
    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General

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