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Economic Integration: Systemic Measures in an Input-Output Framework

Author

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  • Dipti Prakas Pal
  • Erik Dietzenbacher
  • Dipika Basu

Abstract

Countries are linked through trade and for their mutual benefits they often group together. Consequently, trade blocs are formed in some form or another, examples of which are the EU, EFTA, ASEAN, NAFTA, and SAARC. Depending upon the form and the nature of the grouping, trade relations among countries obviously vary across the trade blocs. The pattern and the volume of trade of the participating countries are different and thus cause different impacts on the growth and development of the countries concerned. Also, the nature of integration changes over time. To examine the strength of integration within trade blocs, systemic measures of integration hitherto not available are formulated in an input-output framework. The measures are used, as a case study, to assess the inter-temporal variations in the degree of integration of SAARC.

Suggested Citation

  • Dipti Prakas Pal & Erik Dietzenbacher & Dipika Basu, 2007. "Economic Integration: Systemic Measures in an Input-Output Framework," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 397-408.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:19:y:2007:i:4:p:397-408
    DOI: 10.1080/09535310701698464
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    Cited by:

    1. Ariyasajjakorn, Danupon & Gander, James P. & Ratanakomut, Somchai & Reynolds, Stephen E., 2009. "ASEAN FTA, distribution of income, and globalization," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 327-335, May.

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