IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Value maximizing hurdle rates for R&D investment


  • George Blazenko
  • Andrey Pavlov


We show that the value maximizing hurdle rate for research and development (R&D) investments among private firms operating in a market setting is less than for conventional investments despite the fact that R&D has development risk. Because development risk arises only during R&D, entrepreneurs control this risk by deferring or pursuing R&D depending upon profitability. This risk management moderates downside loss and encourages upside gain which increases the value attraction of R&D and decreases the value maximizing hurdle rate below that of conventional investment.

Suggested Citation

  • George Blazenko & Andrey Pavlov, 2010. "Value maximizing hurdle rates for R&D investment," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(8), pages 693-717.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:19:y:2010:i:8:p:693-717 DOI: 10.1080/10438590903003631

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fagerberg, Jan, 1987. "A technology gap approach to why growth rates differ," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2-4), pages 87-99, August.
    2. Waarts, Eric & Van Everdingen, Yvonne, 2005. "The Influence of National Culture on the Adoption Status of Innovations:: An Empirical Study of Firms Across Europe," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 601-610, December.
    3. Shane, Scott A., 1992. "Why do some societies invent more than others?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 29-46, January.
    4. Mourad Dakhli & Dirk De Clercq, 2004. "Human capital, social capital, and innovation: a multi-country study," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 107-128, March.
    5. Shane, Scott, 1993. "Cultural influences on national rates of innovation," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 59-73, January.
    6. Al James, 2005. "Demystifying the role of culture in innovative regional economies," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1197-1216.
    7. Nasierowski, W. & Arcelus, F. J., 1999. "Interrelationships among the elements of national innovation systems: A statistical evaluation," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 235-253, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    R&D; hurdle rates; real options; Tobin's q;


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:19:y:2010:i:8:p:693-717. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.