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The Political Economy of Legislation on Terrorism


  • S. Brock Blomberg
  • Ashvin Gandhi
  • Gregory D. Hess


-super-1This paper presents an empirical analysis of what drives congressional legislation on terrorism during the period 1995 to 2010. We utilize and augment current methodology to compile and analyze data on sponsorship and cosponsorship of terrorism related data. Our results on the sources of legislation on terrorism are largely in line with past examinations of the importance of committee membership and leadership, party majority-ship, and other political factors. Further, we find that the most significant and robust drive for legislation on terrorism is the September 11-super-th attacks. And while the impact of 9/11 affected legislative productivity everywhere, we find that it most significantly affected states surrounding New York and Washington D.C. Our results indicate that the economy may be one factor motivating politicians to legislate on terrorism; however, these results are not robust. -super-1This research was funded in part by a grant from the Lowe Institute of Political Economy. The corresponding author is S. Brock Blomerg. We thank Chris Blomberg and Brianna Loyosa for their excellent research assistance on the project.

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  • S. Brock Blomberg & Ashvin Gandhi & Gregory D. Hess, 2011. "The Political Economy of Legislation on Terrorism," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(6), pages 607-626, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:22:y:2011:i:6:p:607-626 DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2011.635953

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