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A Note On Rice Production, Consumption And Import Data In Indonesia


  • L. Peter Rosner
  • Neil McCulloch


Debate about Indonesian rice policy has focused on estimates of production and consumption levels, and the level of imports they imply. However, Indonesian rice production and consumption data are controversial. Rice consumption as estimated from household survey data is much lower than officially reported rice production. This suggests that Indonesia is a net rice exporter, but in fact it has generally been a net importer. Some researchers argue that rice consumption data are underestimated; others contend that production is over-estimated because of inaccuracies in 'eye estimates' of harvested area. This paper reviews how rice production and consumption are measured, notes major weaknesses, and surveys attempts to reconcile consumption and production data and examine their consistency with rice import data. It concludes that rice prices are the only accurate indicator of the balance between supply and demand, and hence of the appropriate level of imports.

Suggested Citation

  • L. Peter Rosner & Neil McCulloch, 2008. "A Note On Rice Production, Consumption And Import Data In Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 81-92.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:bindes:v:44:y:2008:i:1:p:81-92 DOI: 10.1080/00074910802001595

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blomstrom, Magnus & Sjoholm, Fredrik, 1999. "Technology transfer and spillovers: Does local participation with multinationals matter?1," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 915-923, April.
    2. Ross Mcleod, 2005. "Survey of recent developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 133-157.
    3. Lisa Cameron, 1999. "Survey of Recent Developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 3-41.
    4. Mudrajad Kuncoro & Tri Widodo & Ross McLeod, 2009. "Survey of recent developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(2), pages 151-176.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neil McCulloch & Edmund Malesky, 2011. "Does better local governance improve district growth performance in Indonesia?," Working Paper Series 1711, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

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