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The retirement behaviour of the self-employed in Britain

Author

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  • Simon Parker
  • Jonathan Rougier

Abstract

We analyze the retirement behaviour of older self-employed workers, using a life cycle framework and a multinomial logit model of dynamic employment and retirement choices. Using data from the two-wave Retirement Survey, we find that greater actual or potential earnings decrease the probability of retirement among the self-employed. In contrast to employees, none of gender, health or family circumstances appear to affect self-employed retirement decisions. The dynamic analysis reveals that relatively few employees and virtually no retirees switch into self-employment in later life. The switches that do occur are motivated less by attempts to use self-employment as a bridge job or 'stepping stone' to full retirement, than by self-employment being a last resort for less affluent workers with job histories of weak attachment to the labour market. We compare self-employed and employee retirement behaviour and discuss the policy implications of our results.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Parker & Jonathan Rougier, 2007. "The retirement behaviour of the self-employed in Britain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 697-713.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:6:p:697-713
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500447807
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fossen, Frank M. & König, Johannes, 2015. "Public health insurance and entry into self-employment," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112934, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Dimitris Christelis & Raquel Fonseca, 2015. "Labor Market Policies and Self-Employment Transitions of Older Workers," Cahiers de recherche 1516, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    3. Nikolaj Malchow-Møller & James Markusen & Jan Skaksen, 2010. "Labour market institutions, learning and self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 35-52, July.
    4. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i::p:144-170 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Nadia Simoes & Nuno Crespo & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2016. "Individual Determinants Of Self-Employment Entry: What Do We Really Know?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(4), pages 783-806, September.
    6. Даниелян, Владимир, 2016. "Детерминанты Пенсионного Возраста: Обзор Исследований
      [Determinants of Retirement Age: A Review of Research]
      ," MPRA Paper 73865, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. repec:kap:sbusec:v:49:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-017-9843-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Stefan Hochguertel, 2010. "Self-Employment around Retirement Age," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-067/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. J L Ford & K Park & S Sen, 2009. "All Work and No Play: Pecuniary Versus Non-Pecuniary Factors in the Labour Supply of the Elderly," Discussion Papers 09-08, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    10. Backman, Mikaela & Karlsson, Charlie, 2013. "Who says life is over after 55? Entrepreneurship and an aging population," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 325, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    11. Hanne Preter & Dorien Looy & Dimitri Mortelmans, 2015. "Retirement Timing of Dual-Earner Couples in 11 European Countries? A Comparison of Cox and Shared Frailty Models," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 396-407, September.
    12. Mikaela Backman, 2013. "Who says life is over after 55? - New firm formation and an ageing population," ERSA conference papers ersa13p58, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Kautonen, Teemu & Kibler, Ewald & Minniti, Maria, 2017. "Late-career entrepreneurship, income and quality of life," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 318-333.
    14. Harris, M.N. & Zhao, X. & Zucchelli, E., 2016. "The dynamics of health and labour market transitions at older ages: evidence from a multi-state model," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/30, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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