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Exploring 3D datasets: a factorial matrices analysis of the US industry in the 1980s


  • Stefano Fachin
  • Dennis Shea
  • Maurizio Vichi


In this paper a Factorial Matrices technique suitable for exploratory analysis of multivariate, disaggregated time series is presented and applied to a data set covering 19 US manufacturing industries over the years 1979 to 1990. The empirical analysis confirms that the technique is a powerful tool, allowing otherwise difficult extraction of stylized facts from multidimensional datasets. In this case: (i) there are no signs of deindustrialization induced by growing import penetration, and, (ii), employment decline has generally not been associated to substitution of capital to labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Fachin & Dennis Shea & Maurizio Vichi, 2002. "Exploring 3D datasets: a factorial matrices analysis of the US industry in the 1980s," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 295-304.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:3:p:295-304
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840110043749

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Abdelhak Senhadji, 1997. "Two common problems related to the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 23-25.
    2. Shoven,John B. & Whalley,John, 1992. "Applying General Equilibrium," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521266550, March.
    3. Brown, Drusilla K., 1987. "Tariffs, the terms of trade, and national product differentiation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 503-526.
    4. Zhuang, Juzhong, 1996. "Estimating Distortions in the Chinese Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(252), pages 543-568, November.
    5. Wang, Zhi, 1997. "The Impact of China and Taiwan Joining the World Trade Organization on U.S. and World Agricultural Trade: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Technical Bulletins 184382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Dewatripont, Mathias & Michel, Gilles, 1987. "On closure rules, homogeneity and dynamics in applied general equilibrium models," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 65-76, June.
    7. Bandara, Jayatilleke S, 1991. " Computable General Equilibrium Models for Development Policy Analysis in LDCs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 3-69.
    8. Dirk Willenbockel, 1999. "On apparent problems with the use of the Armington aggregator in computable general equilibrium models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 589-591.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pietro Alessandrini & Andrea F. Presbitero & Alberto Zazzaro, 2009. "Banks, Distances and Firms' Financing Constraints," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 13(2), pages 261-307.

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