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Financial liberalization and stock market volatility in selected developing countries

Author

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  • Konstantinos Kassimatis

Abstract

This study empirically investigates whether stock market volatility increased following financial liberalization, in six 'emerging' markets. The sample countries are Argentina, India, Pakistan, Philippines, South Korea and Taiwan. To examine the issue, the news impact curves are utilized which relate current volatility to past news. The news impact curves are derived from the parameters of EGARCH models which measure the conditional volatility of stock returns in the sample markets. The results suggest that volatility fell after important liberalization policies were implemented.

Suggested Citation

  • Konstantinos Kassimatis, 2002. "Financial liberalization and stock market volatility in selected developing countries," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(6), pages 389-394.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:12:y:2002:i:6:p:389-394
    DOI: 10.1080/09603100010001937
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Duc Khuong Nguyen & Mondher Bellalah, 2007. "Testing for Structural Breaks and Dynamic Changes in Emerging Market Volatility," Working Papers 02, Development and Policies Research Center (DEPOCEN), Vietnam.
    2. Duc Khuong Nguyen, 2010. "La dynamique de la volatilité boursière autour de l'ouverture des marchés de capitaux," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(1), pages 65-82.
    3. Jaleel, Fazeel M. & Samarakoon, Lalith P., 2009. "Stock market liberalization and return volatility: Evidence from the emerging market of Sri Lanka," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 409-423, December.
    4. Tri Minh Nguyen, 2017. "The Impact of Foreign Investor Trading Activity on Vietnamese Stock Market," International Journal of Marketing Studies, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(1), pages 109-118, February.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:7:y:2007:i:10:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kirt C. Butler & Katsushi Okada, 2008. "Higher-Order Terms in Bivariate Returns to International Stock Market Indices," Multinational Finance Journal, Multinational Finance Journal, vol. 12(1-2), pages 127-155, March-Jun.
    7. Aymen Ben Rejeb & Adel Boughrara, 2015. "Financial integration in emerging market economies: Effects on volatility transmission and contagion," Borsa Istanbul Review, Research and Business Development Department, Borsa Istanbul, vol. 15(3), pages 161-179, September.
    8. Ben Rejeb, Aymen & Boughrara, Adel, 2013. "Financial liberalization and stock markets efficiency: New evidence from emerging economies," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 186-208.
    9. Ramaprasad Bhar & Biljana Nikolova, 2009. "Oil Prices and Equity Returns in the BRIC Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(7), pages 1036-1054, July.
    10. Sang Hoon Kang & SEONG-MIN YOON, 2008. "Asymmetry and Long Memory Features in Volatility: Evidence From Korean Stock Market," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 24, pages 383-412.
    11. Ritab Al-Khouri & Abdulkhader Abdallah, 2012. "Market liberalization and volatility of returns in emerging markets: The case of Qatar Exchange (QSC)," International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(2), pages 106-115, June.
    12. Osamah Al-Khazali & Ali Darrat & Mohsen Saad, 2006. "Intra-regional integration of the GCC stock markets: the role of market liberalization," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(17), pages 1265-1272.

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