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The influence of Agro-terrorism on consumers' preference for locally grown products: a case-study from New Jersey


  • Ramu Govindasamy
  • Calum Turvey
  • Venkata Puduri


The economics of agro-terrorism has not been fully developed within the economics literature, yet with increasing concerns about agro-terrorism it is important to understand how consumers will generally respond. This article presents an overview of food safety issues, and develops an economic model that can be used to illustrate and establish hypotheses regarding consumer behaviour and agro-terrorism. We then present sample and econometric results from a survey of 304 New Jersey consumers and explain the characteristics of the 33% that confirmed that they have increased purchases of locally grown produce due to terrorism fears.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramu Govindasamy & Calum Turvey & Venkata Puduri, 2008. "The influence of Agro-terrorism on consumers' preference for locally grown products: a case-study from New Jersey," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(13), pages 991-995.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:15:y:2008:i:13:p:991-995 DOI: 10.1080/13504850600972337

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Roland Benabou & Efe A. Ok, 2001. "Social Mobility and the Demand for Redistribution: The Poum Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 447-487.
    2. Corneo, Giacomo & Gruner, Hans Peter, 2002. "Individual preferences for political redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 83-107, January.
    3. Gemmell, Norman & Morrissey, Oliver & Pinar, Abuzer, 2003. "Tax perceptions and the demand for public expenditure: evidence from UK micro-data," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 793-816, November.
    4. Liam Delaney & Francis O'Toole, 2007. "Decomposing demand for public expenditure in Ireland," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(15), pages 1091-1095.
    5. David de Vaus & Matthew Gray & David Stanton, 2004. "Measuring the value of unpaid household, caring and voluntary work of older Australians," Labor and Demography 0405006, EconWPA.
    6. Gordon Tarzwell, 2003. "The impact of diverse preferences on government expenditures," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(11), pages 695-698.
    7. Fong, Christina, 2001. "Social preferences, self-interest, and the demand for redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 225-246, November.
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