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Self-enforcing international environmental agreements with a stock pollutant

Author

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  • Santiago Rubio

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  • Begoña Casino

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Abstract

In this paper the stability of an International Environmental Agreement (IEA) among N identical countries that emit a pollutant are studied using a two-stage game. In the first stage each country decides noncooperatively whether or not to join an IEA, and in the second stage signatories jointly against nonsignatories determine their emissions in a dynamic setting defined in continuous time. A numerical simulation shows that a bilateral coalition is the unique self-enforcing IEA independently of the gains coming from cooperation and the kind of strategies played by the agents (open-loop or feedback strategies). We have also studied the effects of a minimum participation clause finding that for this case a self-enforcing IEA just consists of the number of countries established in the clause. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Santiago Rubio & Begoña Casino, 2005. "Self-enforcing international environmental agreements with a stock pollutant," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 89-109, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:specre:v:7:y:2005:i:2:p:89-109
    DOI: 10.1007/s10108-005-0098-6
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hans-Peter Weikard & Leo Wangler & Andreas Freytag, 2015. "Minimum Participation Rules with Heterogeneous Countries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(4), pages 711-727, December.
    2. Bruno Nkuiya, 2012. "The Effects of the Length of the Period of Commitment on the Size of Stable International Environmental Agreements," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 411-430, December.
    3. Marco Battaglini & Bård Harstad, 2016. "Participation and Duration of Environmental Agreements," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(1), pages 160-204.
    4. Bruno Nkuiya & Walid Marrouch & Eric Bahel, 2015. "International Environmental Agreements under Endogenous Uncertainty," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(5), pages 752-772, October.
    5. Casas, Omar J. & Romera, Rosario, 2011. "The international stock pollutant control: a stochastic formulation with transfers," DES - Working Papers. Statistics and Econometrics. WS ws112217, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Estadística.
    6. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10797-017-9463-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Xiao Chen & Alan Woodland, 2013. "International trade and climate change," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(3), pages 381-413, June.
    8. Emilson C. D. Silva, 2017. "Self-enforcing agreements under unequal nationally determined contributions," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 24(4), pages 705-729, August.
    9. Leo Wangler & Juan-Carlos Altamirano-Cabrera & Hans-Peter Weikard, 2013. "The political economy of international environmental agreements: a survey," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 387-403, September.
    10. Emmi Nieminen & Lone Grønbæk Kronbak & Marko Lindroos, 2016. "International Agreements in the Multispecies Baltic Sea Fisheries," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(1), pages 109-134, September.
    11. Casas, Omar J. & Romera, Rosario, 2009. "Controlling the international stock pollutant with policies depending on target values," DES - Working Papers. Statistics and Econometrics. WS ws096019, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Estadística.
    12. Michèle Breton & Lucia Sbragia & Georges Zaccour, 2010. "A Dynamic Model for International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 45(1), pages 25-48, January.
    13. Calvo, Emilio & Rubio, Santiago J., 2013. "Dynamic Models of International Environmental Agreements: A Differential Game Approach," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 6(4), pages 289-339, April.
    14. Hassan Benchekroun & Amrita Ray Chaudhuri, 2015. "Cleaner Technologies and the Stability of International Environmental Agreements," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(6), pages 887-915, December.
    15. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5873 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Rubio, Santiago J. & Ulph, Alistair, 2007. "An infinite-horizon model of dynamic membership of international environmental agreements," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 296-310, November.
    17. Lina Mallozzi & Stefano Patri & Armando Sacco, 2015. "Differential Game Approach for International Environmental Agreements with Social Externalities," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 9(3), pages 135-154, December.
    18. Günther, Michael & Hellmann, Tim, 2017. "International environmental agreements for local and global pollution," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 38-58.
    19. Marta Biancardi & Andrea Di Liddo, 2008. "International Environmental Agreement: a Dynamic Model of Emissions Reduction," Quaderni DSEMS 13-2008, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche, Matematiche e Statistiche, Universita' di Foggia.

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