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Predictors of Health Utility in Relapsing–Remitting and Secondary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Future Economic Models of Disease-Modifying Therapies

Author

Listed:
  • Luis Hernandez

    (University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen)

  • Malinda O’Donnell

    (Evidera)

  • Maarten Postma

    (University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen
    University of Groningen, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy
    University of Groningen)

Abstract

Background Decision-analytic models used in economic evaluations of disease-modifying therapies for relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) have characterized disease progression and accrue quality-adjusted life-years from utility values based on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the occurrence of relapses, and progression to secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). The EDSS, used to characterize disability progression, has several limitations. If the EDSS is the only disability measure used in economic evaluations, the long-term clinical and economic implications of disease-modifying therapies may not be properly assessed. Objective The objective of this study was to explore if supplementary disability measures including the Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) significantly contribute additional information on health utility in RRMS and SPMS otherwise not captured by the EDSS and relapses and, therefore, should be considered in future economic evaluations of disease-modifying therapies. Methods Short-Form Six-Dimension utility scores were derived from the RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0 individual-level data available in the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Assessment Consortium (MSOAC) Placebo Database. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models were conducted to estimate the effects of EDSS, T25FW, 9HPT (dominant and non-dominant hand), PASAT, and relapses on changes in utility over time, controlling for demographics. Results A higher level of EDSS, longer time to complete the T25FW test, and a recent relapse were significant predictors of lower utility in people with RRMS and SPMS. 9HPT and PASAT were not significant predictors. Conclusions This study suggests that in addition to EDSS and recent relapses, T25FW significantly predicts utility in RRMS and SPMS. These findings support the use of T25FW to supplement the EDSS and the occurrence of relapses to characterize the course of disease progression and to more accurately accrue quality-adjusted life-years in future economic evaluations of disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of RRMS.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Hernandez & Malinda O’Donnell & Maarten Postma, 2021. "Predictors of Health Utility in Relapsing–Remitting and Secondary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: Implications for Future Economic Models of Disease-Modifying Therapies," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 243-256, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:pharme:v:39:y:2021:i:2:d:10.1007_s40273-020-00964-w
    DOI: 10.1007/s40273-020-00964-w
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 15th March 2021
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2021-03-15 12:00:14

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