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Public Pensions, Family Allowances and Endogenous Demographic Change

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  • Peters, Wolfgang

Abstract

In addition to an old-age insurance system which redistributes income from the young to the old, family allowances build a further redistributive system which typically favors younger and burdens older generations. Family allowances have tow main tasks: first, child allowances offer an incentive for child-bearing which influences fertility in an economy. Second, subsidies which ease the financial burden of a child's education guarantee a higher average level of productive skills and therefore enhance net domestic product. If individual demand for having and educating children leads to an impact on the economic system as a whole, we have external effects. In such a case, corrective taxation (Pigouvian tax) should be considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Peters, Wolfgang, 1995. "Public Pensions, Family Allowances and Endogenous Demographic Change," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 8(2), pages 161-183, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:8:y:1995:i:2:p:161-83
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ags:pdcbeh:264613 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cremer, Helmuth & Gahvari, Firouz & Pestieau, Pierre, 2011. "Fertility, human capital accumulation, and the pension system," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1272-1279.
    3. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_609 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Marek Loužek, 2007. "Pension Reform in the Czech Republic - A Contribution into the Debate," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2007(1), pages 55-69.
    5. Meier, Volker & Wrede, Matthias, 2010. "Pensions, fertility, and education," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 75-93, January.
    6. Concepció Patxot & Elisenda Rentería & Miguel Romero & Guadalupe Souto, 2012. "Measuring the balance of government intervention on forward and backward family transfers using NTA estimates: the modified Lee arrows," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 19(3), pages 442-461, June.
    7. Alessandro Cigno & Annalisa Luporini, 2011. "Optimal Family Policy in the Presence of Moral Hazard when the Quantity and Quality of Children are Stochastic," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(2), pages 349-364, June.
    8. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori, 2014. "Endogenous fertility, endogenous lifetime and economic growth: the role of child policies," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 529-564, April.
    9. Kolmar, Martin & Meier, Volker, 2012. "Intragenerational externalities and intergenerational transfers," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(04), pages 531-548, October.
    10. Kolmar, Martin, 1997. "Optimal intergenerational redistribution and strategic incentives with two countries and endogenous fertility: Theory and application to the European Union," Discussion Papers, Series II 340, University of Konstanz, Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 178 "Internationalization of the Economy".
    11. Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Kumar, Ronald, 2014. "Enhancing Growth and Welfare through debt-financed Education," MPRA Paper 59455, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Robert Fenge & Volker Meier, 2005. "Pensions and fertility incentives," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(1), pages 28-48, February.
    13. Jinno, Masatoshi & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Are the social security benefits of pensions or child-care policies best financed by a consumption tax?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center (PRADEC), vol. 0(Issue 3).
    14. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:10:y:2003:i:4:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Alessandro Cigno & Annalisa Luporini, 2006. "Optimal Policy Towards Families with Different Amounts of Social Capital, in the Presence of Asymmetric Information and Stochastic Fertility," CESifo Working Paper Series 1664, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Peter J. Stauvermann & Ronald R. Kumar, 2016. "Sustainability of A Pay-as-you-Go Pension System in A Small Open Economy with Ageing, Human Capital and Endogenous Fertility," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 2-20, February.
    17. Gianko Michailidis & Concepció Patxot, 2018. "Political viability of intergenerational transfers. An empirical application," UB Economics Working Papers 2018/370, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    18. Cigno, A., 2016. "Conflict and Cooperation Within the Family, and Between the State and the Family, in the Provision of Old-Age Security," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.
    19. Kolmar, Martin, 1997. "Zur Effizienz nationaler Sozialversicherungssysteme in der Europäischen Union," Discussion Papers, Series II 341, University of Konstanz, Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 178 "Internationalization of the Economy".
    20. Kolmar, Martin, 2001. "Optimal Intergenerational Redistribution in a Two-Country Model with Endogenous Fertility," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 106(1-2), pages 23-51, January.

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