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Patients whose GP knows complementary medicine tend to have lower costs and live longer

Author

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  • Peter Kooreman

    ()

  • Erik Baars

Abstract

Since the differences are obtained while controlling for confounders including neighborhood specific fixed effects at a highly detailed level, the lower costs and longer lives are unlikely to be related to differences in socioeconomic status. Possible explanations include selection (e.g. people with a low taste for medical interventions might be more likely to choose CAM) and better practices (e.g. less overtreatment, more focus on preventive and curative health promotion) by GPs with knowledge of complementary medicine. More controlled studies (replication studies, research based on more comprehensive data, cost-effectiveness studies on CAM for specific diagnostic categories) are indicated. Copyright The Author(s) 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kooreman & Erik Baars, 2012. "Patients whose GP knows complementary medicine tend to have lower costs and live longer," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 769-776, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:13:y:2012:i:6:p:769-776
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-011-0330-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10198-011-0330-2
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Bad science in health economics: complementary medicine, costs and mortality
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-06-05 09:00:58

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Sampson & David Whitehurst & Andrew Street, 2013. "Do patients registered with CAM-trained GPs really use fewer health care resources and live longer? A response to Kooreman and Baars. Eur J Health Econ (2012). 13:469–776," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(4), pages 703-705, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Healthcare costs; Life expectancy; Complementary medicine; I11; I12;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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