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Analyzing perceived hunger across states in the US

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel J. Slottje

    () (Department of Economics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275, USA)

  • Hang K. Ryu

    () (Department of Economics, Chung Ang University, Seoul, Korea)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the problem of analyzing how factors impact hunger across states when hunger is ill-defined. Hunger (which is a latent variable) is presumed to depend on macroeconomic, legislation, policy, and demographic variables. Based on the Bayesian method of a posterior odds ratios, we find that the high school graduation rate appears to be the single most important factor we identify which affects the perceived hunger measure.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel J. Slottje & Hang K. Ryu, 1999. "Analyzing perceived hunger across states in the US," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 323-329.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:24:y:1999:i:2:p:323-329 Note: received: December 1996/final version received: September 1998
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    6. Hussain, S. Sajidin & Byerlee, Derek R., 1995. "Education and Farm Productivity in Post- 'green revolution' Agriculture in Asia," 1994 Conference, August 22-29, 1994, Harare, Zimbabwe 183412, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Hausman, Jerry A., 1983. "Specification and estimation of simultaneous equation models," Handbook of Econometrics,in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 391-448 Elsevier.
    8. Feder, Gershon & Lau, Lawrence J. & Lin, Justin Y. & Xiaopeng Luo, 1991. "Credit's effect on productivity in Chinese agriculture : a microeconomic model of disequilibrium," Policy Research Working Paper Series 571, The World Bank.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Quantifying hunger;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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