IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Generalized Habit Formation in an Inverse Almost Ideal Demand System: An Application to Meat Expenditures in the U.S


  • Holt, Matthew T
  • Goodwin, Barry K


The Inverse Almost Ideal Demand System (IAIDS) model of Moschini and Vissa (1992) and Eales and Unnevehr (1994) is extended to include: (1) general, nonlinear, nonadditive habit effects; and (2) a specification for habit stock terms that allow purchases from the distant past to influence current consumption (long memory). The resulting models are compared with a linear habit effects model and a static specification. The empirical estimation is on U.S. quarterly meat expenditures (1961-1993), with each model being subjected to a battery of misspecification tests. Results of these tests, along with tests of homogeneity and symmetry restrictions, indicate clearly that the most generalized dynamic specification--the one with nonlinear, nonadditive long-memory habit stock effects--is preferred. Furthermore, persistence effects are found to be qualitatively important in that flexibility, consumption scale, and habit flexibility estimates differ, in some instances substantially, between alternative specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Holt, Matthew T & Goodwin, Barry K, 1997. "Generalized Habit Formation in an Inverse Almost Ideal Demand System: An Application to Meat Expenditures in the U.S," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 293-320.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:22:y:1997:i:2:p:293-320

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    2. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Returns to Research and Development Expenditures in the Private Sector," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 49-81 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Esposti, Roberto & Pierani, Pierpaolo, 2000. "Modelling technical change in Italian agriculture: a latent variable approach," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 261-270, April.
    4. Chambers,Robert G., 1988. "Applied Production Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521314275, March.
    5. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1992. "Public Finance in Models of Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 645-661.
    6. Morrison, Catherine J & Schwartz, Amy Ellen, 1996. "State Infrastructure and Productive Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1095-1111, December.
    7. Mundlak, Yair, 2001. "Production and supply," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-85 Elsevier.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Dorfman, Jeffrey H. & Karali, Berna, 2010. "Do Farmers Hedge Optimally or by Habit? A Bayesian Partial-Adjustment Model of Farmer Hedging," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(04), pages 791-803, November.
    2. Goodwin, Barry K. & Harper, Daniel C. & Schnepf, Randall D., 2003. "Short-Run Demand Relationships in the U.S. Fats and Oils Complex," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(01), April.
    3. Piggott, Nicholas E., 2006. "Consumer Price Formation with Demographic Translating," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25252, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Eric Sjöberg, 2014. "Pricing the Fish Market- Does size matter?," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2014_01, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    5. Beach, Robert H. & Zhen, Chen, 2008. "Consumer Purchasing Behavior in Response to Media Coverage of Avian Influenza," 2008 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2008, Dallas, Texas 6750, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. Zhen, Chen & Wohlgenant, Michael K., 2006. "Food Safety and Habits in U.S. Meat Demand under Rational Expectations," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21287, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Thomas L. Marsh, 2005. "Economic substitution for US wheat food use by class ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(3), pages 283-301, September.
    8. Panos Fousekis & Brian J. Revell, 2002. "Primary Demand for Red Meats in the United Kingdom," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 63, pages 31-50.
    9. Yi, DongGyu, 2014. "Three studies on environmental valuation," ISU General Staff Papers 201401010800005065, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    10. Matthew T. Holt & Joseph V. Balagtas, 2009. "Estimating Structural Change with Smooth Transition Regressions: An Application to Meat Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1424-1431.
    11. Silva, Andres & Dharmasena, Senarath, 2013. "Modeling Seasonal Unit Roots as a Simple Empirical Method to Handle Autocorrelation in Demand Systems: Evidence from UK Expenditure Data," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149928, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Yeboah, Godfred & Maynard, Leigh J., 2004. "The Impact Of Bse, Fmd, And U.S. Export Promotion Expenditures On Japanese Meat Demand," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19978, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Karagiannis, Giannis & Katranidis, Stelios D. & Velentzas, K., 2000. "An error correction almost ideal demand system for meat in Greece," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(1), January.
    14. Marsh, Thomas L., 2003. "Elasticities for U.S. Wheat Food Use by Class," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57920, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    15. Peyton Ferrier & Chen Zhen, 2014. "The producer welfare effects of trade liberalization when goods are perishable and habit-forming: the case of asparagus," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(2), pages 129-141, March.
    16. Rodriguez, Nestor & Eales, James S., 2015. "Structural Change via Threshold Effects: Estimating U.S. Meat Demand Using Smooth Transition Functions and the Effects of More Women in the Labor Force," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 206522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    17. Andres Silva & Senarath Dharmasena, 2016. "Considering seasonal unit root in a demand system: an empirical approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 1443-1463, December.
    18. Hilmer, Christiana E. & Holt, Matthew T., 1999. "The Almost Ideal Supply System And Agricultural Production In The United States," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21659, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:22:y:1997:i:2:p:293-320. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.