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Growth at the fringe: The influence of political fragmentation in United States metropolitan areas

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  • John Carruthers

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Abstract

Urban sprawl has evolved into an exceptionally complex public policy problem in the United States over the course of recent decades. One factor that has made it particularly difficult to deal with is its relationship to the fragmented structure of the American system of land use governance. Acting on behalf of their residents, local governments enact land use regulations to secure lifestyle preferences for low density, suburban living environments while at the same time ensuring a high quality of public service provision. This article examines the effect of this process on metropolitan spatial structure through a series of econometric models designed to test the following hypothesis: that fragmentation promotes sprawl by increasing the proportion of growth that occurs at the unincorporated urban fringe. The estimation results reveal substantive evidence that municipal fragmentation and several related factors - including special districts, infrastructure investments, and white flight processes - have a significant and enduring effect on the growth of outlying areas. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2003

Suggested Citation

  • John Carruthers, 2003. "Growth at the fringe: The influence of political fragmentation in United States metropolitan areas," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 82(4), pages 475-499, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:82:y:2003:i:4:p:475-499
    DOI: 10.1007/s10110-003-0148-0
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Albert Solé-Ollé & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2007. "Economic and political determinants of urban expansion: Exploring the local connection," Working Papers 2007/5, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    2. Thomas E. Lambert & James Catchen & Victoria Vogelgesang, 2015. "The Impact of Urban Sprawl on Disaster Relief Spending: An Exploratory Study," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(3), pages 835-864, July.
    3. Miriam Hortas-Rico, 2015. "Sprawl, Blight, And The Role Of Urban Containment Policies: Evidence From U.S. Cities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 298-323, March.
    4. Lambert, Thomas & Meyer, Peter, 2008. "New and fringe residential development and emergency medical services response times in the United States," MPRA Paper 38891, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. John I. Carruthers, 2012. "Land use regulation and regional form: a spatial mismatch?," Chapters,in: Networks, Space and Competitiveness, chapter 8, pages 181-204 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Monkkonen, Paavo & Quigley, John M., 2008. "The Spatial Consequences of Autarky in Land-Use Regulation: Strategic Interaction or Parallelism?," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt69p752cd, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    7. Hipp, John R. & Kane, Kevin, 2017. "Cities and the larger context: What explains changing levels of crime?," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 32-44.
    8. Boarnet, Marlon G. & McLaughlin, Ralph B. & Carruthers, John I., 2011. "Does state growth management change the pattern of urban growth? Evidence from Florida," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 236-252, May.
    9. Björn Kauder, 2016. "Incorporation of municipalities and population growth: A propensity score matching approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(3), pages 539-554, August.
    10. Marc Brunetto & Nadine Levratto, 2017. "Analysis of the job creation process in metropolitan areas: A spatial perspective," EconomiX Working Papers 2017-36, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    11. Grassmueck, Georg & Goetz, Stephan J. & Shields, Martin, 2008. "Youth Out-Migration from Pennsylvania: The Roles of Government Fragmentation vs. the Beaten Path Effect," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 38(1).
    12. Huang, Ke & Zhang, An-lu, 2015. "Relationship between Rural-Urban Land Conservation and Economic Development of Metropolitans in China," 2015 Conference (59th), February 10-13, 2015, Rotorua, New Zealand 202526, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    13. Belal N. Fallah & Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2011. "Urban sprawl and productivity: Evidence from US metropolitan areas," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(3), pages 451-472, August.
    14. Belal Fallah & Mark Partridge & M. Olfert, 2012. "Uncertain economic growth and sprawl: evidence from a stochastic growth approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-617, December.
    15. Guangqing Chi & David Marcouiller, 2011. "Isolating the Effect of Natural Amenities on Population Change at the Local Level," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 491-505.
    16. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Integrating Regional Economic Development Analysis and Land Use Economics," Economics Working Paper Series 1203, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.

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