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The models and economics of carpools

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  • Hai-Jun Huang

    (School of Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, 100083, P.R. China Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong Transport Operations Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK)

  • Hai Yang

    (School of Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, 100083, P.R. China Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong Transport Operations Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK)

  • Michael G.H. Bell

    (School of Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, 100083, P.R. China Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong Transport Operations Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK)

Abstract

For studying carpooling problems, this paper presents two models, namely deterministic and stochastic, and gives the economic explanations to the model solutions. We investigate the jockeying behavior of work commuters between carpooling and driving alone modes through solving each model for both no-toll equilibrium and social optimum. The logit-based stochastic model involves the consideration on preference option of mode choice. Under some assumptions, the paper explains how the amount of carpooling is affected by fuel cost, assembly cost, value of time, preferential or attitudinal factors and traffic congestion. It is found that carpooling is sensitive to traffic congestion reduction only when a congestion externality-based tolling scheme is implemented.

Suggested Citation

  • Hai-Jun Huang & Hai Yang & Michael G.H. Bell, 2000. "The models and economics of carpools," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1), pages 55-68.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:34:y:2000:i:1:p:55-68
    Note: Received: August 1997/Accepted: October 1998
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Xiao, Ling-Ling & Liu, Tian-Liang & Huang, Hai-Jun, 2016. "On the morning commute problem with carpooling behavior under parking space constraint," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 383-407.
    2. Jun Guan Neoh & Maxwell Chipulu & Alasdair Marshall, 2017. "What encourages people to carpool? An evaluation of factors with meta-analysis," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 423-447, March.
    3. Kerwin Kofi Charles & Patrick Kline, 2006. "Relational Costs and the Production of Social Capital: Evidence from Carpooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(511), pages 581-604, April.
    4. Oren Bahat & Shlomo Bekhor, 2016. "Incorporating Ridesharing in the Static Traffic Assignment Model," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 1125-1149, December.
    5. Wang, Rui, 2011. "Shaping carpool policies under rapid motorization: the case of Chinese cities," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 631-635, August.
    6. Agatz, Niels & Erera, Alan & Savelsbergh, Martin & Wang, Xing, 2012. "Optimization for dynamic ride-sharing: A review," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 223(2), pages 295-303.
    7. Khandker Nurul Habib & Yuan Tian & Hamid Zaman, 2011. "Modelling commuting mode choice with explicit consideration of carpool in the choice set formation," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 587-604, July.
    8. Watling, D.P. & Shepherd, S.P. & Koh, A., 2015. "Cordon toll competition in a network of two cities: Formulation and sensitivity to traveller route and demand responses," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 93-116.
    9. Huang, Hai-Jun, 2002. "Pricing and logit-based mode choice models of a transit and highway system with elastic demand," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 140(3), pages 562-570, August.
    10. Stephen DeLoach & Thomas Tiemann, 2012. "Not driving alone? American commuting in the twenty-first century," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 521-537, May.
    11. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly & Faulkner, Guy E.J. & Buliung, Ron N. & Lay, Jennifer & Stone, Michelle, 2012. "The school run: Exploring carpooling as an intervention option in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), Canada," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 134-140.
    12. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part II: Policy instruments for sustainable road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 46-91.

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