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Values as Motivation Factors of Economic Behaviour


  • Martin Lacny

    (University of Prešov, Slovakia)


The article presents a reflection on the structure of values functioning as motivators of economic behaviour. Considering the principle of rational egoism the author describes three segments of crucial values, which seem to be fundamental, as a matter of the contemporary Euro American economic value system: freedom and justice; responsibility and confidence; progress, prosperity and rationality. An important methodological basis of presented reflection is the Ethics of social consequences dynamically developing consequentialist ethical theory, responding to the challenges arising in the field of applied ethics in the framework of efforts to solve practical problems of today's world.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Lacny, 2013. "Values as Motivation Factors of Economic Behaviour," Journal of Economic Development, Environment and People, Alliance of Central-Eastern European Universities, vol. 2(4), pages 74-83, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sph:rjedep:v:2:y:2013:i:4:p:74-83

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    values; economic behaviour; freedom; justice; responsibility; confidence; progress; prosperity; rationality;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification


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