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Introducing the UCDP Georeferenced Event Dataset

Author

Listed:
  • Ralph Sundberg

    (Department of Peace and Conflict Research & Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP), Uppsala University)

  • Erik Melander

    () (Department of Peace and Conflict Research & Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP), Uppsala University)

Abstract

This article presents the UCDP Georeferenced Event Dataset (UCDP GED). The UCDP GED is an event dataset that disaggregates three types of organized violence (state-based conflict, non-state conflict, and one-sided violence) both spatially and temporally. Each event – defined as an instance of organized violence with at least one fatality – comes with date, geographical location, and identifiers that allow the dataset to be linked to and merged with other UCDP datasets. The first version of the dataset covers events of fatal violence on the African continent between 1989 and 2010. This article, firstly, introduces the rationale for the new dataset, and explains the basic coding procedures as well as the quality controls. Secondly, we discuss some of the data’s potential weaknesses in representing the universe of organized violence, as well as some potential biases induced by the operationalizations. Thirdly, we provide an example of how the data can be used, by illustrating the association between cities and organized violence, taking population density into account. The UCDP GED is a useful resource for conflict analyses below the state and country-year levels, and can provide us with new insights into the geographical determinants and temporal sequencing of warfare and violence.

Suggested Citation

  • Ralph Sundberg & Erik Melander, 2013. "Introducing the UCDP Georeferenced Event Dataset," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 50(4), pages 523-532, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:joupea:v:50:y:2013:i:4:p:523-532
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    Cited by:

    1. Cheng, Qing & Lu, Xin & Liu, Zhong & Huang, Jincai & Cheng, Guangquan, 2016. "Spatial clustering with Density-Ordered tree," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 460(C), pages 188-200.
    2. Stelios Michalopoulos & Elias Papaioannou, 2016. "The Long-Run Effects of the Scramble for Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(7), pages 1802-1848, July.
    3. repec:eee:joepsy:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:184-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stijn van Weezel, 2016. "Communal violence in the Horn of Africa following the 1998 El Niño," Working Papers 201617, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    5. Juergen Bitzer & Erkan Goeren, 2018. "Foreign Aid and Subnational Development: A Grid Cell Analysis," Working Papers V-407-18, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2018.
    6. Rabah Arezki & Sambit Bhattacharyya & Nemera Mamo, 2015. "Resource Discovery and Conflict in Africa: What Do the Data Show?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-14, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. Achim Ahrens, 2015. "Civil conflicts in Africa: Climate, economic shocks, nighttime lights and spill-over effects," SEEC Discussion Papers 1501, Spatial Economics and Econometrics Centre, Heriot Watt University.
    8. Eoin McGuirk & Marshall Burke, 2017. "The Economic Origins of Conflict in Africa," NBER Working Papers 23056, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Skali, Ahmed, 2017. "Moralizing gods and armed conflict," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 184-198.
    10. Michael Spagat & Neil Johnson & Stijn van Weezel, 2017. "David Versus Goliath: Fundamental Patterns and Predictions in Modern Wars and Terrorist Campaigns," Working Papers 201721, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    11. Ahrens Achim, 2015. "Civil Conflicts, Economic Shocks and Night-time Lights," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(4), pages 433-444, December.
    12. Bryce W. Reeder & Matthew R. Reeder, 2014. "Political Violence, Interstate Rivalry, and the Diffusion of Public Health Crises," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1101-1120, December.
    13. Mario A. Maggioni & Sara Balestri, 2016. "This land is my land! Large-Scale Land Acquisitions and conflict events in Sub-Saharan Africa," DISEIS - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo dis1603, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo (DISEIS).
    14. Stijn van Weezel, 2017. "Communal violence in the Horn of Africa following the 1998 El Niño," HiCN Working Papers 241 updated, Households in Conflict Network.
    15. Bussmann Margit & Dorussen Han & Gleditsch Nils Petter, 2014. "Against All Odds: 2013 Richardson Award to Mats Hammarström and Peter Wallensteen," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 1-9, April.
    16. Balestri Sara & Maggioni Mario A., 2014. "Blood Diamonds, Dirty Gold and Spatial Spill-overs Measuring Conflict Dynamics in West Africa," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-14, December.
    17. Paul Bezerra & Alex Braithwaite, 2016. "Locating foreign aid commitments in response to political violence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 169(3), pages 333-355, December.
    18. Fjelde, Hanne, 2015. "Farming or Fighting? Agricultural Price Shocks and Civil War in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 525-534.
    19. Stijn van Weezel, 2017. "The Effect of Civil War Violence on Aid Allocations in Uganda," Working Papers 201725, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    20. Gudrun Østby, 2016. "Violence Begets Violence: Armed conflict and domestic sexual violence in Sub-Saharan Africa," HiCN Working Papers 233, Households in Conflict Network.
    21. Stijn van Weezel, 2017. "Mostly Harmless? A Subnational Analysis of the Aid-Conflict Nexus," Working Papers 201728, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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