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Quantifying intelligence cooperation: The United States International Intelligence Behavior (USIIB) dataset


  • Ersel Aydinli

    () (Department of International Relations, Bilkent University)

  • Musa Tuzuner

    (Intelligence Studies Research Center, Turkish National Police Academy)


This report describes the creation of the United States International Intelligence Behavior dataset (USIIB). The USIIB represents the first collection of event data specifically intended for exploring in a quantifiable manner the international intelligence cooperation behaviors of the United States. A total of 293,615 events are recorded in the USIIB, covering the years 2000-09. The report first provides a detailed description of the steps involved in building such a dataset, including the development of search terms, the use of a machine coding program (TABARI - Text Analysis by Augmenting Replacement Instructions) to extract data from wire news releases, and the extension of an existing coding scheme (CAMEO) to include intelligence behaviors. Following a discussion of issues related to the reliability and validity of event datasets in general and the USIIB in particular, the report then includes suggestions and examples for how the data in the current USIIB dataset may be used in order to add to our understandings of patterns and anomalies in international intelligence cooperation behavior. As a specific example, it offers results from an empirical test exploring variation in intelligence cooperation behaviors among democracies and non-democracies, asking specifically whether the United States has been more likely in the early 21st century to cooperate on intelligence matters with democratic states, and finding this not to have been the case. Finally, it aims to provide a guide for others who would like to extend this dataset to explore intelligence cooperation activity of other countries or regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ersel Aydinli & Musa Tuzuner, 2011. "Quantifying intelligence cooperation: The United States International Intelligence Behavior (USIIB) dataset," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 48(5), pages 673-682, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:joupea:v:48:y:2011:i:5:p:673-682

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