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The Hiring of an Economist: A Case Study


  • Jessica Holmes
  • David Colander


This paper provides information about the economics PhD job market by providing a case study of one particular buyer in the 2005 job market for economists. Specifically, it provides information on the nuances of the market such as what is going on in buyers' minds when they select who to interview, and when they ask interview questions. It also distills some advice to job seekers from that case study.

Suggested Citation

  • Jessica Holmes & David Colander, 2007. "The Hiring of an Economist: A Case Study," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 51(1), pages 54-62, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:amerec:v:51:y:2007:i:1:p:54-62

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles A. Holt & Susan K. Laury, 1997. "Classroom Games: Voluntary Provision of a Public Good," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 209-215, Fall.
    2. Michael Pickhardt, 2005. "Teaching Public Goods Theory With a Classroom Game," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 145-159, April.
    3. Lewis, Ben W, 1970. "A Retrospective Look at Undergraduate Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(2), pages 370-375, May.
    4. Becker, William E., 2004. "Good-byE old, hello new in teaching economics," Australasian Journal of Economics Education (AJEE), University of Queensland, School of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 5-17, March.
    5. Becker, William E, Jr, 1979. "Professorial Behavior Given a Stochastic Reward Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 1010-1017, December.
    6. Becker, William E & Greene, William & Rosen, Sherwin, 1990. "Research on High School Economic Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 14-22, May.
    7. Peter Hans Matthews, 2001. "Positive Feedback and Path Dependence Using the Law of Large Numbers," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 124-136, January.
    8. William E. Becker, 2004. "Economics for a Higher Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 3(1), pages 52-62.
    9. John A. List, 2003. "Does Market Experience Eliminate Market Anomalies?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 41-71.
    10. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    11. Charles A. Holt, 1996. "Classroom Games: Trading in a Pit Market," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 193-203, Winter.
    12. Simon P. Anderson & Maxim Engers, 2002. "A Beautiful Blonde: a Nash coordination game," Virginia Economics Online Papers 359, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
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