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Interregional Migration In Romania After 1990


  • Constantin, Daniela Luminita

    (Academy of Economic Studies)

  • Goschin, Zizi

    (Academy of Economic Studies)

  • Parlog, Cornelia

    (Academy of Economic Studies)


The present paper examines the main changes in the intensity, orientation and territorial distance of internal migration flows, as well as their structure and the variable influence of the ‘push/pull’ factors involved in this process. Population and labor mobility between regions has been studied using a set of indicators calculated for the 1990-2003 period: gross and net migration, in- and out-migration rates, in- and out-migration flows for the selected zones, their structure and dynamics and so on. Regression functions, interregional migration tables and gravity models have been mainly employed. In order to point out the most important migration flows at the national level, their orientation and distance, four counties (Iasi, Constanta, Timis and Bucharest) have been selected considering their major relevance in terms of geographical position and migration intensity. For these counties, an aggregate gravity model has been proposed in order to analyze the migration flows and forecast them for 2002 and 2006. Finally, the paper discusses the economic policy measures able to reduce the long-distance migration and the intensity of the ‘push’ factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Constantin, Daniela Luminita & Goschin, Zizi & Parlog, Cornelia, 2005. "Interregional Migration In Romania After 1990," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 2(2), pages 5-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:rjr:romjef:v:2:y:2005:i:2:p:5-25

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    labor resources; migration flows; migration indicators; gravity model; interregional migration table;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models


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